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Urinary isolates of apramycin-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae from Dublin

  • A. P. Johnson (a1), M. Malde (a1), N. Woodford (a1), R. J. Cunney (a2) and E. G. Smyth (a2)...

Summary

Twenty-two gentamicin-resistant urinary isolates of Escherichia coli and five gentamicin-resistant urinary isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae from a Dublin hospital were examined for resistance to the veterinary aminoglycoside antibiotic apramycin. Five isolates of E. coli and one isolate of K. pneumoniae were found to be resistant. The apramycin-resistant isolates, which were also resistant to the veterinary anthelmintic agent hygromycin B, hybridized with a DNA probe for the gene encoding the enzyme 3-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase type IV (AAC(3)IV). Resistance to apramycin and hygromycin B was co-transferable in four of the five isolates of E. coli and the isolate of K. pneumoniae. In one isolate of E. coli apramycin resistance was not transferable. On the basis of their restriction enzyme digestion profiles and the antimicrobial resistance traits encoded, the transferable plasmids encoding resistance to apramycin and hygromycin B comprised three distinct types. Genetic linkage between the gene encoding AAC(3)IV and genes encoding resistance to ampicillin and either tetracycline or trimethoprim, means that the relatively widespread use of these antimicrobial agents provides a selective pressure for the persistence of resistance to apramycin and gentamicin even in the absence of bacterial exposure to aminoglycosides.

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References

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Urinary isolates of apramycin-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae from Dublin

  • A. P. Johnson (a1), M. Malde (a1), N. Woodford (a1), R. J. Cunney (a2) and E. G. Smyth (a2)...

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