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Unusually high illness severity and short incubation periods in two foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella Heidelberg infections with potential coincident Staphylococcus aureus intoxication

  • J. H. NAKAO (a1), D. TALKINGTON (a2), C. A. BOPP (a2), J. BESSER (a2), M. L. SANCHEZ (a3), J. GUARISCO (a3), S. L. DAVIDSON (a3), C. WARNER (a3), M. G. McINTYRE (a3), J. P. GROUP (a4), N. COMSTOCK (a5), K. XAVIER (a5), T. S. PINSENT (a4), J. BROWN (a4), J. M. DOUGLAS (a4), G. A. GOMEZ (a2), N. M. GARRETT (a2), H. A. CARLETON (a2), B. TOLAR (a2) and M. E. WISE (a1)...

Summary

We describe the investigation of two temporally coincident illness clusters involving salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in two states. Cases were defined as gastrointestinal illness following two meal events. Investigators interviewed ill persons. Stool, food and environmental samples underwent pathogen testing. Alabama: Eighty cases were identified. Median time from meal to illness was 5·8 h. Salmonella Heidelberg was identified from 27 of 28 stool specimens tested, and coagulase-positive S. aureus was isolated from three of 16 ill persons. Environmental investigation indicated that food handling deficiencies occurred. Colorado: Seven cases were identified. Median time from meal to illness was 4·5 h. Five persons were hospitalised, four of whom were admitted to the intensive care unit. Salmonella Heidelberg was identified in six of seven stool specimens and coagulase-positive S. aureus in three of six tested. No single food item was implicated in either outbreak. These two outbreaks were linked to infection with Salmonella Heidelberg, but additional factors, such as dual aetiology that included S. aureus or the dose of salmonella ingested may have contributed to the short incubation periods and high illness severity. The outbreaks underscore the importance of measures to prevent foodborne illness through appropriate washing, handling, preparation and storage of food.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr J. H. Nakao (for post and fax: c/o Dr Matthew Wise), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE MS-A-38, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. (Email: jnakao@cdc.gov)

References

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