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Tuberculosis in East Sussex: IV. A systematic examination of wild mammals other than badgers for tuberculosis

  • J. W. Wilesmith (a1), P. E. Sayers (a2), T. W. A. Little (a1), J. I. Brewer (a1), R. Bode (a3), G. D. B. Hillman (a2), D. G. Pritchard (a1) and F. A. Stuart (a1)...

Summary

A detailed investigation of the possible role of wild mammals, other than badgers, in the maintenance of Mycobacterium bovis in an area on the South Downs of East Sussex was carried out over 3 years. Estimates of population sizes were made where possible and minimum sample sizes were selected to be 95 % certain of including at least one infected animal if the prevalence was at least 5 %. Samples of wild mammals were taken from populations which had the highest potential direct or indirect contact rate with known infected badgers. M. bovis was not isolated from any of the 15 species of wild mammals.

It was concluded that badgers are able to maintain M. bovis in an area independently of other species, and that in the area studied other species were not a source of infection for the cattle herds.

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References

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Tuberculosis in East Sussex: IV. A systematic examination of wild mammals other than badgers for tuberculosis

  • J. W. Wilesmith (a1), P. E. Sayers (a2), T. W. A. Little (a1), J. I. Brewer (a1), R. Bode (a3), G. D. B. Hillman (a2), D. G. Pritchard (a1) and F. A. Stuart (a1)...

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