Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Trends of hospitalisations rates in a cohort of HIV-infected persons followed in an Italian hospital from 1998 to 2016

  • S. Bellino (a1), A. Borghetti (a2), F. Lombardi (a3), L. Camoni (a4), A. Ciccullo (a3), G. Baldin (a3), S. Belmonti (a3), D. Moschese (a3), S. Lamonica (a2), R. Cauda (a2) (a3), P. Pezzotti (a1) and S. Di Giambenedetto (a2) (a3)...

Abstract

Here we evaluated hospitalisation rates and associated risk factors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals who were followed up in an Italian reference hospital from 1998 to 2016. Incidence rates (IR) of hospitalisations were calculated for five study periods from 1998 to 2016. The random-effects Poisson regression model was used to assess risk factors for hospitalisation including demographic and clinical characteristics. To consider that more events may occur for the same subject, multiple failure-time data analysis was also performed for selected causes using the Cox proportional hazards model. We evaluated 2031 patients. During 13 173 person-years (py) of follow-up, 3356 hospital admissions were carried out for 756 patients (IR: 255 per 1000 py). IR decreased significantly over the study period, from 634 in 1998–2000 to 126 per 1000 py in 2013–2016. Major declines were detected for AIDS-defining events, non-HIV/AIDS-related infections and neurological diseases. Older age, female sex, longer HIV duration and HCV coinfection were associated with a higher hospitalisation risk, whereas higher CD4 nadir and antiretroviral therapy were associated with a reduced risk. Influence of advanced HIV disease markers declined over time. Hospitalisation rates decreased during the study period in most causes. The relative weight of hospitalisations for non-AIDS-related tumours, cardiovascular, respiratory and kidney diseases increased during the study period, whereas those for AIDS-defining events declined.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Trends of hospitalisations rates in a cohort of HIV-infected persons followed in an Italian hospital from 1998 to 2016
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Trends of hospitalisations rates in a cohort of HIV-infected persons followed in an Italian hospital from 1998 to 2016
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Trends of hospitalisations rates in a cohort of HIV-infected persons followed in an Italian hospital from 1998 to 2016
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: F. Lombardi, E-mail: francesca.lombardi@gmail.com

Footnotes

Hide All
*

These authors contributed equally to this work

Footnotes

References

Hide All
1.Buchacz, K et al. (2008) Rates of hospitalizations and associated diagnoses in a large multisite cohort of HIV patients in the United States, 1994–2005. AIDS (London, England) 22, 13451354.
2.Gebo, KA, Diener-West, M and Moore, RD (2001) Hospitalization rates in an urban cohort after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 27, 143152.
3.Palella, FJ Jr et al. (1998) Declining morbidity and mortality among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection. HIV Outpatient Study Investigators. New England Journal of Medicine 338, 853860.
4.Paul, S et al. (2002) Impact of antiretroviral therapy on decreasing hospitalization rates of HIV-infected patients in 2001. AIDS Research Human Retroviruses 18, 501506.
5.Volberding, PA and Deeks, SG (2010) Antiretroviral therapy and management of HIV infection. Lancet 376, 4962.
6.Mocroft, A et al. (2000) Immunological, virological and clinical response to highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment regimens in a complete clinic population. Royal Free Centre for HIV Medicine. AIDS (London, England) 14, 15451552.
7.Mocroft, A et al. (2003) Decline in the AIDS and death rates in the EuroSIDA study: an observational study. Lancet 362, 2229.
8.Crum-Cianflone, NF et al. (2010) Trends and causes of hospitalizations among HIV-infected persons during the late HAART era: what is the impact of CD4 counts and HAART use? Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 54, 248257.
9.Falster, K et al. (2010) Hospitalizations in a cohort of HIV patients in Australia, 1999–2007. AIDS (London, England) 24, 13291339.
10.Marin, B et al. (2009) Non-AIDS-defining deaths and immunodeficiency in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. AIDS (London, England) 23, 17431753.
11.Mocroft, A et al. (2004) Changes in hospital admissions across Europe: 1995–2003. Results from the EuroSIDA study. HIV Medicine 5, 437447.
12.Lin, DY (1994) Cox regression analysis of multivariate failure time data: the marginal approach. Statistics in Medicine 13, 22332247.
13.Driver, JA et al. (2008) Incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer in advanced age: prospective cohort study. BMJ 337, a2467.
14.Nasi, M et al. (2017) Ageing and inflammation in patients with HIV infection. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 187, 4452.
15.Catumbela, E et al. (2015) HIV disease burden, cost, and length of stay in Portuguese hospitals from 2000 to 2010: a cross-sectional study. BMC Health Services Research 15, 144.
16.Coelho, LE et al. (2017) Hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV infected patients from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases 21, 190195.
17.Crowell, TA et al. (2015) Hospitalization rates and reasons among HIV elite controllers and persons with medically controlled HIV infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases 211, 16921702.
18.Lazar, R et al. (2017) Hospitalization rates among people with HIV/AIDS in New York city, 2013. Clinical Infectious Diseases 65, 469476.
19.Mahlab-Guri, K et al. (2017) Hospitalizations of HIV patients in a major Israeli HIV/AIDS center during the years 2000 to 2012. Medicine (Baltimore) 96, e6812.
20.Oramasionwu, CU et al. (2014) National trends in hospitalization and mortality rates for patients with HIV, HCV, or HIV/HCV coinfection from 1996–2010 in the United States: a cross-sectional study. BMC Infectious Diseases 14, 536.
21.Tai, M, Liu, T and Merchant, RC (2015) Hospitalizations in the United States among HIV-infected individuals in short-stay hospitals, 1982 to 2010. Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care 14, 408414.
22.Smit, M et al. (2016) Quantifying the future clinical burden of an ageing HIV positive population in Italy: a mathematical modelling study. Abstracts of the International Congress of Drug Therapy in HIV Infection 23–26 October 2016, Glasgow, UK. Abstract P156. In.

Keywords

Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary materials

Bellino et al. supplementary material
Table S3

 Word (85 KB)
85 KB
WORD
Supplementary materials

Bellino et al. supplementary material
Table S2

 Word (81 KB)
81 KB
WORD
Supplementary materials

Bellino et al. supplementary material
Table S1

 Word (109 KB)
109 KB

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed