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The survival of foot-and-mouth disease virus in open air conditions

  • A. I. Donaldson (a1) and N. P. Ferris (a1)

Summary

The influence of the Open Air Factor (OAF) and daylight on the survival of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus held as captured aerosols on spider micro-threads has been investigated. Virus inactivation due to OAF was slight. Similarly, the effect of daylight on the survival of virus was not marked. The results are discussed in relation to the airborne spread of FMD virus in nature.

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References

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The survival of foot-and-mouth disease virus in open air conditions

  • A. I. Donaldson (a1) and N. P. Ferris (a1)

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