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Source attribution of human campylobacteriosis in Denmark

  • L. BOYSEN (a1), H. ROSENQUIST (a1), J. T. LARSSON (a2), E. M. NIELSEN (a2), G. SØRENSEN (a1), S. NORDENTOFT (a3) and T. HALD (a1)...

Summary

This study assesses the contribution of different sources of human campylobacteriosis in Denmark using two different source-attribution approaches. In total, 794 non-human isolates and 406 isolates from human cases (domestic, travel related, and cases with unknown travel history) were collected. Isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, flaA typing and susceptibility to antibiotics. Both models used indicate that the major burden of human campylobacteriosis in Denmark originates from the domestic broiler chicken reservoir. The second most important reservoir was found to be cattle. The Asymmetric Island model attributed 52% [95% credibility interval (CrI) 37–67] to Danish chicken, 17% (95% CrI 3–33) to imported chicken, and 17% (95% CrI 7–28) to cattle. Similarly, the Campylobacter source-attribution model apportioned 38% (95% CrI 28–47) to Danish chicken, 14% (95% CrI 10–18) to imported chicken, and 16% (95% CrI 7–25) to cattle. The addition of flaA type as an extra discriminatory typing parameter did not change the attribution of cases markedly.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Ms. L. Boysen, Technical University of Denmark, National Food Institute, Department of Microbiology and Risk Assessment, Moerkhoej Bygade 19, 2860 Soeborg, Denmark. (Email: lobo@food.dtu.dk)

References

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