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The size of airborne dust particles precipitating bronchospasm in house dust sensitive children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2009

R. P. Clark
Affiliation:
Division of Hospital Infection, Clinical Research Centre, Harrow
T. D. Preston
Affiliation:
Medical Computer Centre, Westminster Hospital, London SW 1
D. C. Gordon-Nesbitt
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London, WC 1, and St Stephen's Hospital, Fuiham Road, London, SW 10
S. Malka
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London, WC 1, and St Stephen's Hospital, Fuiham Road, London, SW 10
L. Sinclair
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, London, WC 1, and St Stephen's Hospital, Fuiham Road, London, SW 10
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Summary

We have assessed the effect of house-cleaning procedures on changes in airborne dust and bacteria counts and correlated these with respiratory function tests in 14 children with bronchial asthma who were known to have developed attacks at home, and who had positive skin tests to house dust and the house-dust mite.

We have demonstrated that after cleaning procedures a positive and statistically significant correlation exists between the increase in the numbers of small particles, 2 μm. and less in diameter, in the environment, and reduction in mean peak flow. This indicates that particles of this size penetrate the bronchial tree and are the causative factor in the genesis of bronchospasm.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1976

References

Berrens, L., (1970). The allergens in house dust. Progress in Allergy 14, 259.Google ScholarPubMed
Clark, R. P. (1973). Techniques for sampling and identifying airborne particles. Journal of Physiology 232, 5.Google ScholarPubMed
Clark, R. P. (1974). Skin scales among airborne particles. Journal of Hygiene 72, 47.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cooke, R. A. (1922). Studies in specific hypersensitiveness. Journal of immunology 7, 147.Google Scholar
Kern, A. (1921). Dust sensitisation in bronchial asthma. Medical Clinics of North America 5, 751.Google Scholar
Sarsfield, J. K. (1974). Role of house dust mites in childhood asthma. Archives of Disease in Childhood 49, 711.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sabsfield, J. K., Gowland, C., Toy, R., & Norman, A. L. E. (1974). Mite sensitive asthma in childhood. Archives of Disease in Childhood 49, 716.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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