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The size of airborne dust particles precipitating bronchospasm in house dust sensitive children

  • R. P. Clark (a1), T. D. Preston (a2), D. C. Gordon-Nesbitt (a3), S. Malka (a3) and L. Sinclair (a3)...

Summary

We have assessed the effect of house-cleaning procedures on changes in airborne dust and bacteria counts and correlated these with respiratory function tests in 14 children with bronchial asthma who were known to have developed attacks at home, and who had positive skin tests to house dust and the house-dust mite.

We have demonstrated that after cleaning procedures a positive and statistically significant correlation exists between the increase in the numbers of small particles, 2 μm. and less in diameter, in the environment, and reduction in mean peak flow. This indicates that particles of this size penetrate the bronchial tree and are the causative factor in the genesis of bronchospasm.

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Copyright

References

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Berrens, L., (1970). The allergens in house dust. Progress in Allergy 14, 259.
Clark, R. P. (1973). Techniques for sampling and identifying airborne particles. Journal of Physiology 232, 5.
Clark, R. P. (1974). Skin scales among airborne particles. Journal of Hygiene 72, 47.
Cooke, R. A. (1922). Studies in specific hypersensitiveness. Journal of immunology 7, 147.
Kern, A. (1921). Dust sensitisation in bronchial asthma. Medical Clinics of North America 5, 751.
Sarsfield, J. K. (1974). Role of house dust mites in childhood asthma. Archives of Disease in Childhood 49, 711.
Sabsfield, J. K., Gowland, C., Toy, R., & Norman, A. L. E. (1974). Mite sensitive asthma in childhood. Archives of Disease in Childhood 49, 716.

The size of airborne dust particles precipitating bronchospasm in house dust sensitive children

  • R. P. Clark (a1), T. D. Preston (a2), D. C. Gordon-Nesbitt (a3), S. Malka (a3) and L. Sinclair (a3)...

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