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Serological survey of a new type of reovirus in humans in China

  • B. BAI (a1), H. SHEN (a1), Y. HU (a1), J. HOU (a1), Z. LIU (a2), R. LI (a1), Y. CHAI (a1), W. HUANG (a1) and P. MAO (a1)...

Summary

To evaluate the presence of a new type of reovirus (designated R4) in humans, we determined the prevalence of specific antibodies using a neutralization assay and ELISA. The sera from 97 healthy people and 219 patients in our hospital with measles, hand-foot-and-mouth disease, liver diseases, and diarrhoea were investigated. Although the study population was limited, our data suggested that R4 is widespread in the human population. A significantly higher level of R4-specific antibody in patients than in healthy people is worthy of consideration, since it poses a risk for aggravation of the extant illness by the reovirus.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Professor P. Mao, Department of Virology, Institute of Infectious Disease, 302 Hospital, No. 100 Xi Si Huan Middle Road, Feng Tai District, Beijing 100039, PR China. (Email: maopy302@hotmail.com)

References

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