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Secretor status and humoral immune responses to Neisseria lactamica and Neisseria meningitidis

  • A. A. Zorgani (a1), J. Stewart (a1), C. C. Blackwell (a1), R. A. Elton (a2) and D. M. Weir (a1)...

Summary

Non-secretors of ABO blood group antigens are over-represented among patients with meningococcal diseases. Lower levels of secretory IgA reported for non-secretors have been suggested to compromise mucosal defences. Total serum and salivary IgG, IgA and IgM and levels of these isotypes specific for Neisseria lactamica and five isolates of meningococci were determined by ELISA for 357 pupils and staff of a secondary school in which an outbreak of meningitis occurred. There were no differences in total or specific levels of serum IgG, IgA or IgM or salivary IgG or IgA of secretors compared with non-secretors. Non-secretors had significantly lower levels of salivary IgM (P=0·022) A similar pattern was observed for levels of IgM specific for N. lactamica and five meningococcal isolates. The significance of these results is discussed with reference to the role of secretory IgM in protection of mucosal surfaces in infants.

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References

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