Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Screening for Chagas' disease in HIV-positive immigrants from endemic areas

  • A. RODRÍGUEZ-GUARDADO (a1), V. ASENSI ALVAREZ (a1), M. RODRÍGUEZ PEREZ (a2), P. MEJUTO ALVAREZ (a2), M. FLORES-CHAVEZ (a3), P. ALONSO GONZÁLEZ (a2) and J. A. CARTÓN SÁNCHEZ (a1)...

Summary

Chagas' disease is an opportunistic infection in the setting of HIV/AIDS. The arrival of HIV-positive immigrants from endemic areas to non-endemic countries makes possible the detection of Chagas' disease in this group of patients. We describe the results of a screening programme conducted in the HIV-positive immigrant population arriving from endemic areas who attended the Tropical Medicine Unit of Hospital Universitario Central of Asturias during 2008. We determined anti-T. cruzi antibodies in all HIV patients arriving from endemic areas who were followed up. The ID-Chagas antibody test was used as a screening assay. The positive cases were confirmed with ELISA, IFAT and PCR. We analysed 19 HIV-positive immigrants, of which two (10·5%) had a positive antibody test for Chagas' disease confirmed. PCR was positive in both cases. There was no difference between the co-infected and the non-co-infected patients with respect to race, place of birth and residence, CD4+ cell count, and HIV viral load count. Direct microscopic examination of blood was negative in both positive cases. The positive patients were a man from Bolivia and woman from Paraguay. The overlap of HIV and T. cruzi infection occurs not only in endemic areas but also in non-endemic areas of North America and Europe where the diagnosis may be even more difficult due to low diagnostic suspicion. The implementation of screening programmes in this population group is needed for the early diagnostic of Chagas' disease.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Screening for Chagas' disease in HIV-positive immigrants from endemic areas
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Screening for Chagas' disease in HIV-positive immigrants from endemic areas
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Screening for Chagas' disease in HIV-positive immigrants from endemic areas
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr A. Rodríguez-Guardado, Infectious Diseases Unit, Hospital Central de Asturias, C/Celestino Villamil s/n, 33006, Oviedo, Spain. (Email: azucenarodriguez@telecable.es)

References

Hide All
1.Hotez, PJ, et al. The neglected tropical diseases of Latin America and the Caribbean: a review of disease burden and distribution and a roadmap for control and elimination. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 2008; 24: e300.
2.Franco-Paredes, C, et al. Chagas disease: an impediment in achieving the millennium development goals in Latin America. BMC International Health and Human Rights 2007; 7: 7.
3.Schmunis, GA. Epidemiology of Chagas disease in non-endemic countries: the role of international migration. Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 2007; 102 (Suppl. 1): 7585.
4.Rodriguez-Morales, AJ, et al. Chagas disease screening among Latin American immigrants in non-endemic settings. Travel Medicine Infectious Disease 2008; 6: 162163.
5.ONUSIDA. 2008 Report on the global AIDS epidemic (http://www.unaids.org/es/KnowledgeCentre/HIVData/GlobalReport/2008/2008_Global_report.asp). Accessed 3 July 2009.
6.Sartori, AM, et al. Exacerbation of HIV viral load simultaneous with asymptomatic reactivation of chronic Chagas' disease. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2002; 67: 521523.
7.Gorlin, J, et al. Evaluation of a new Trypanosoma cruzi antibody assay for blood donor screening. Transfusion 2008; 48: 531540.
8.Flores-Chávez, M, et al. Transfusional chagas disease: parasitological and serological monitoring of an infected recipient and blood donor. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2008; 46: 4447.
9.Dolcini, G, et al. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-Trypanosoma cruzi co-infection and injectable-drugs abuse in a Buenos Aires health center. Revista Argentina de Microbiología 2008; 40: 164166.
10.Eurostat. Europa 2006. Immigration by sex and citizenship (http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu.). Accessed 28 September 2008.
11.Spanish Statistical Institute. Previous dates on immigration 2008 (http://www.ine.es/prensa/np503.pdf). Accessed 28 September 2008.
12.Caro-Murillo, AM, et al. Spanish cohort of naive HIV-infected patients (CoRIS): rationale, organization and initial results [in Spanish]. Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica 2007; 25: 2331.
13.Sartori, AM, et al. Trypanosoma cruzi parasitemia in chronic Chagas disease: comparison between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative patients. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2002; 186: 872875.
14.Sartori, AM, et al. Manifestations of Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) in patients with HIV/AIDS. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 2007; 101: 3150.
15.Diazgranados, CA, et al. Chagasic encephalitis in HIV patients: common presentation of an evolving epidemiological and clinical association. Lancet Infectious Diseases 2009; 9: 324330.
16.Cordova, E, et al. Reactivation of Chagas disease with central nervous system involvement in HIV-infected patients in Argentina, 1992–2007. International Journal of Infectious Diseases 2008; 12: 587592.
17.Corti, M. AIDS and Chagas' disease. AIDS Patient Care and STDs 2000; 14: 581588.
18.Corti, M, Yampolsky, C. Prolonged survival and immune reconstitution after chagasic meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical 2006; 39: 8588.
19.Da-Cruz, AM, et al. Long-term follow-up of co-infected HIV and Trypanosoma cruzi Brazilian patients. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2004; 98: 728733.
20.Gascón, J.Grupo de Trabajo del Taller Enfermedad de Chagas Importada: Un Nuevo Reto de Salud Pública? Diagnosis and treatment of imported Chagas disease. Medicina Clinica (Barcelona) 2005; 125: 230235.
21.Almeida, EA, et al. Chagas' disease and HIV co-infection in patients without effective antiretroviral therapy: prevalence, clinical presentation and natural history. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published online: 18 March 2010. doi:10.1016/j.trstmh.2010.02.004.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed