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Risk factors for acquisition of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli and development of community-acquired urinary tract infections

  • U. V. UKAH (a1), M. GLASS (a2), B. AVERY (a3), D. DAIGNAULT (a4), M. R. MULVEY (a5) (a6), R. J. REID-SMITH (a3) (a7), E. J. PARMLEY (a3), A. PORTT (a8), P. BOERLIN (a9) and A. R. MANGES (a2) (a10)...

Summary

We examined risk factors associated with the intestinal acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) and development of community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) in a case-control study of young women across Canada. A total of 399 women were recruited; 164 women had a UTI caused by E. coli resistant to ⩾1 antimicrobial classes and 98 had a UTI caused by E. coli resistant to ⩾3 antimicrobial classes. After adjustment for age, student health service (region of Canada) and either prior antibiotic use or UTI history, consumption of processed or ground chicken, cooked or raw shellfish, street foods and any organic fruit; as well as, contact with chickens, dogs and pet treats; and travel to Asia, were associated with an increased risk of UTI caused by antimicrobial resistant E. coli. A decreased risk of antimicrobial resistant UTI was associated with consumption of apples, nectarines, peppers, fresh herbs, peanuts and cooked beef. Drug-resistant UTI linked to foodborne and environmental exposures may be a significant public health concern and understanding the risk factors for intestinal acquisition of existing or newly emerging lineages of drug-resistant ExPEC is important for epidemiology, antimicrobial stewardship and prevention efforts.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: A. R. Manges, UBC, School of Population and Public Health, 137-2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. (Email: amee.manges@ubc.ca)

References

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