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Relative transmissibility of hand, foot and mouth disease from male to female individuals

  • Yuxue Liao (a1), Yaqing He (a1), Yan Lu (a1), Hong Yang (a1), Yanhua Su (a2), Yi-Chen Chiang (a2), Benhua Zhao (a2), Huawei Xiong (a1) and Tianmu Chen (a2)...

Abstract

Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) has spread widely and leads to high disease burden in many countries. However, relative transmissibility from male to female individuals remains unclear. HFMD surveillance database was built in Shenzhen City from 2013 to 2017. An intersex transmission susceptible–infectious–recovered model was developed to calculate the transmission relative rate among male individuals, among female individuals, from male to female and from female to male. Two indicators, ratio of transmission relative rate (Rβ) and relative transmissibility index (RTI), were developed to assess the relative transmissibility of male vs. female. During the study period, 270 347 HFMD cases were reported in the city, among which 16 were death cases with a fatality of 0.0059%. Reported incidence of total cases, male cases and female cases was 0.0057 (range: 0.0036–0.0058), 0.0052 (range: 0.0032–0.0053) and 0.0044 (range: 0.0026–0.0047), respectively. The difference was statistically significant between male and female (t = 3.046, P = 0.002). Rβ of male vs. female, female vs. female, from female to male vs. female and from male to female vs. female was 7.69, 1.00, 1.74 and 7.13, respectively. RTI of male vs. female, female vs. female, from female to male vs. female and from male to female vs. female was 3.08, 1.00, 1.88 and 1.43, respectively. Transmissibility of HFMD is different between male and female individuals. Male cases seem to be more transmissible than female.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Tianmu Chen, E-mail: 13698665@qq.com

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These authors contributed equally to this study.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Relative transmissibility of hand, foot and mouth disease from male to female individuals

  • Yuxue Liao (a1), Yaqing He (a1), Yan Lu (a1), Hong Yang (a1), Yanhua Su (a2), Yi-Chen Chiang (a2), Benhua Zhao (a2), Huawei Xiong (a1) and Tianmu Chen (a2)...

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