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Prevalence of eae-positive, lactose non-fermenting Escherichia albertii from retail raw meat in China

  • H. WANG (a1), Q. LI (a1), X. BAI (a2), Y. XU (a2), A. ZHAO (a2), H. SUN (a2), J. DENG (a1), B. XIAO (a1), X. LIU (a1), S. SUN (a1), Y. ZHOU (a1), B. WANG (a1), Z. FAN (a1), X. CHEN (a1), Z. ZHANG (a1), J. XU (a2) (a3) and Y. XIONG (a2) (a3)...

Summary

Escherichia albertii is a newly emerging enteric pathogen that has been associated with gastroenteritis in humans. Recently, E. albertii has also been detected in healthy and sick birds, animals, chicken meat and water. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of the eae-positive, lactose non-fermenting E. albertii strains in retail raw meat in China were evaluated. Thirty isolates of such strains of E. albertii were identified from 446 (6·73%) samples, including duck intestines (21·43%, 6/28), duck meat (9·52%, 2/21), chicken intestines (8·99%, 17/189), chicken meat (5·66%, 3/53), mutton meat (4·55%, 1/22) and pork meat (2·44%, 1/41). None was isolated from 92 samples of raw beef meat. Strains were identified as E. albertii by phenotypic properties, diagnostic PCR, sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, and housekeeping genes. Five intimin subtypes were harboured by these strains. All strains possessed the II/III/V subtype group of the cdtB gene, with two strains carrying another copy of the I/IV subtype group. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed high genetic diversity of E. albertii in raw meats. Our findings indicate that E. albertii can contaminate various raw meats, posing a potential threat to public health.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr Y. Xiong, State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, Beijing, China. (Email: xiongyanwen@icdc.cn)

References

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Prevalence of eae-positive, lactose non-fermenting Escherichia albertii from retail raw meat in China

  • H. WANG (a1), Q. LI (a1), X. BAI (a2), Y. XU (a2), A. ZHAO (a2), H. SUN (a2), J. DENG (a1), B. XIAO (a1), X. LIU (a1), S. SUN (a1), Y. ZHOU (a1), B. WANG (a1), Z. FAN (a1), X. CHEN (a1), Z. ZHANG (a1), J. XU (a2) (a3) and Y. XIONG (a2) (a3)...

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