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Preponderance of toxigenic Escherichia coli in stool pathogens correlates with toxin detection in accessible drinking-water sources

  • H. IGBOKWE (a1) (a2), S. BHATTACHARYYA (a3), S. GRADUS (a3), M. KHUBBAR (a3), D. GRISWOLD (a3), J. NAVIDAD (a3), C. IGWILO (a2), D. MASSON-MEYERS (a1) and A. A. AZENABOR (a1)...

Summary

Since early detection of pathogens and their virulence factors contribute to intervention and control strategies, we assessed the enteropathogens in diarrhoea disease and investigated the link between toxigenic strains of Escherichia coli from stool and drinking-water sources; and determined the expression of toxin genes by antibiotic-resistant E. coli in Lagos, Nigeria. This was compared with isolates from diarrhoeal stool and water from Wisconsin, USA. The new Luminex xTAG GPP (Gastroplex) technique and conventional real-time PCR were used to profile enteric pathogens and E. coli toxin gene isolates, respectively. Results showed the pathogen profile of stool and indicated a relationship between E. coli toxin genes in water and stool from Lagos which was absent in Wisconsin isolates. The Gastroplex technique was efficient for multiple enteric pathogens and toxin gene detection. The co-existence of antibiotic resistance with enteroinvasive E. coli toxin genes suggests an additional prognostic burden on patients.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr A. A. Azenabor, Enderis Hall, Room 459, University of Wisconsin, 2400 E. Hartford Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA. (Email: aazenabo@uwm.edu)

References

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Keywords

Preponderance of toxigenic Escherichia coli in stool pathogens correlates with toxin detection in accessible drinking-water sources

  • H. IGBOKWE (a1) (a2), S. BHATTACHARYYA (a3), S. GRADUS (a3), M. KHUBBAR (a3), D. GRISWOLD (a3), J. NAVIDAD (a3), C. IGWILO (a2), D. MASSON-MEYERS (a1) and A. A. AZENABOR (a1)...

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