Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

PCR to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory tract samples: evaluation of clinical data

  • F. P. ROZALES (a1) (a2), A. B. M. P. MACHADO (a3), F. DE PARIS (a3), A. P. ZAVASCKI (a4) and A. L. BARTH (a1) (a2) (a3)...

Summary

Tuberculosis (TB) remains as an important public health problem worldwide. Therefore, the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis is of primary importance to effectively reduce transmission in patients. The aims of this study were to evaluate two in-house molecular tests: nested PCR (nPCR) and real-time PCR (rtPCR) to detect M. tuberculosis complex directly from clinical samples. The results were compared to the culture results and to the culture results plus clinical data of patients. The rtPCR and nPCR presented high sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) (rtPCR 97·6% and 91·5%, nPCR 85·7% and 92·7%, respectively) compared to culture. When the results of the molecular tests were compared to the culture plus clinical data the Se and Sp were 90·2% and 97·3% for rtPCR and 80·4% and 98·6% for the nPCR, respectively. The results demonstrated that molecular assays of M. tuberculosis can provide a sensitive and rapid diagnostic of TB, and when used in addition to the clinical data of TB patients will help to improve the Sp of the diagnosis of pulmonary TB.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      PCR to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory tract samples: evaluation of clinical data
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      PCR to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory tract samples: evaluation of clinical data
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      PCR to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory tract samples: evaluation of clinical data
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Ms. F. P. Rozales, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Serviço de Patologia Clínica, 2350 Ramiro Barcelos St, 90035-903, Porto Alegre, Brasil. (Email: frozales@hotmail.com)

References

Hide All
1. Maartens, G, Wilkinson, RJ. Tuberculosis. Lancet 2007; 370: 20302043.
2. Lönnroth, K, et al. Tuberculosis control and elimination 2010–50: cure, care, and social development. Lancet 2010; 375: 18141829.
3. Hanson, C, Floyd, K, Weil, D. Tuberculosis in the poverty alleviation agenda. In: Raviglione, M, ed. TB: A Comprehensive International Approach. New York: Informa Healthcare, 2006, pp. 10971114.
4. Griffith, DE, et al. ATS Mycobacterial Diseases Subcommittee, American Thoracic Society, and Infectious Disease Society of America. An official ATS/IDSA statement: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nontuberculous mycobacterial diseases. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 2007; 175: 367416.
5. Abu-Raddad, LJ, et al. Epidemiological benefits of more-effective tuberculosis vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 2009; 106: 1398013985.
6. Ma, Z, et al. Global tuberculosis drug development pipeline: the need and the reality. Lancet 2010; 375: 21002109.
7. Wallis, RS, et al. Biomarkers and diagnostics for tuberculosis: progress, needs, and translation into practice. Lancet 2010; 375: 19201937.
8. Bark, CM, et al. Time to detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as an alternative to quantitative cultures. Tuberculosis 2011; 91: 257259.
9. Espy, MJ, et al. Real-time PCR in clinical microbiology: applications for routine laboratory testing. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 2006; 19: 165256.
10. Greco, S, et al. Diagnostic accuracy of in-house pcr for pulmonary tuberculosis in smear-positive patients: meta-analysis and meta-regression. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2009; 47: 569576.
11. Murray, SJ, et al. Optimisation of acid fast smears for the direct detection of mycobacteria in clinical samples. Journal of Clinical Pathology 2003; 56: 613615.
12. World Health Organization. Global tuberculosis report, 2012 (http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/75938/1/9789241564502_eng.pdf). Accessed 22 June 2013.
13. Dora, JM, et al. Polymerase chain reaction as a useful and simple tool for rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis in a Brazilian tertiary care hospital. Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases 2008; 12: 245247.
14. Inoue, M, et al. Audit and improve! Evaluation of a real-time probe-based PCR assay with internal control for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious 2011; 30: 131135.
15. Greco, S, et al. Current evidence on diagnostic accuracy of commercially based nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Thorax 2006; 61: 783790.
16. Antonenka, U, et al. Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF with ProbeTec ET DTB and COBAS TaqMan MTB for direct detection of M. tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens. BMC Infectious Diseases 2013; 13: 14712334.
17. Gomez, DI, et al. Rapid DNA extraction for specific detection and quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum specimens using Taqman assays. Tuberculosis 2011; 91: 4348.
18. Laraque, F, et al. Performance of nucleic acid amplification tests for diagnosis of tuberculosis in a large urban setting. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2009; 49: 4654.
19. Lemaître, N, et al. Comparison of the real-time PCR method and the Gen-Probe amplified Mycobacterium tuberculosis direct test for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary and nonpulmonary specimens. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2004; 42: 43074309.
20. Marlowe, EM, et al. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert MTB/RIF assay for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from respiratory specimens. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2011; 49: 16211623.
21. CDC. Update: nucleic acid amplification tests for tuberculosis. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2000; 49: 593594.
22. CDC. Treatment of Tuberculosis, American Thoracic Society, CDC, and Infectious Diseases Society of America. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2003; 52 (RR–11).
23. Dinnes, J, et al. A systematic review of rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of tuberculosis infection. Health Technology Assessment 2007; 11: 1196.
24. Halse, TA, et al. Combined real-time PCR and rpoB Gene pyrosequencing for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and determination of rifampin resistance directly in clinical specimens. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2010; 48: 11821188.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed