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Outbreaks of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection: USA

  • R. E. LUNA-GIERKE (a1), P. M. GRIFFIN (a1), L. H. GOULD (a1), K. HERMAN (a1), C. A. BOPP (a1), N. STROCKBINE (a1) and R. K. MODY (a1)...

Summary

Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections are increasingly detected, but sources are not well established. We summarize outbreaks to 2010 in the USA. Single-aetiology outbreaks were defined as ⩾2 epidemiologically linked culture-confirmed non-O157 STEC infections; multiple-aetiology outbreaks also had laboratory evidence of ⩾2 infections caused by another enteric pathogen. Twenty-six states reported 46 outbreaks with 1727 illnesses and 144 hospitalizations. Of 38 single-aetiology outbreaks, 66% were caused by STEC O111 (n = 14) or O26 (n = 11), and 84% were transmitted through food (n = 17) or person-to-person spread (n = 15); food vehicles included dairy products, produce, and meats; childcare centres were the most common setting for person-to-person spread. Of single-aetiology outbreaks, a greater percentage of persons infected by Shiga toxin 2-positive strains had haemolytic uraemic syndrome compared with persons infected by Shiga toxin 1-only positive strains (7% vs. 0·8%). Compared with single-aetiology outbreaks, multiple-aetiology outbreaks were more frequently transmitted through water or animal contact.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: R. E. Luna-Gierke, MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mailstop C-09, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, USA 30333. (Email: RGierke@cdc.gov)

References

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Outbreaks of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection: USA

  • R. E. LUNA-GIERKE (a1), P. M. GRIFFIN (a1), L. H. GOULD (a1), K. HERMAN (a1), C. A. BOPP (a1), N. STROCKBINE (a1) and R. K. MODY (a1)...

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