Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to a pasteurized ice cream product served to hospitalized patients

  • K. RIETBERG (a1), J. LLOYD (a1), B. MELIUS (a2), P. WYMAN (a3), R. TREADWELL (a4), G. OLSON (a5), M.-G. KANG (a5) and J. S. DUCHIN (a1) (a6)...

Summary

Two cases of hospital-acquired listeriosis were linked to a commercially produced, pasteurized ice cream mix. Manufacturers should implement safety measures from the Food Safety Modernization Act to minimize the risk of Listeria contamination. Dietary guidelines for persons at high risk of listeriosis may need revision to recognize the potential risk from pasteurized products.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to a pasteurized ice cream product served to hospitalized patients
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to a pasteurized ice cream product served to hospitalized patients
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked to a pasteurized ice cream product served to hospitalized patients
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Mrs K. Rietberg, 401 5th Ave Suite 900, Seattle, WA, 98104, USA. (Email: Krista.rietberg@kingcounty.gov) (Email: Jenny.Lloyd@kingcounty.gov)

References

Hide All
1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital signs: Listeria illnesses, deaths, and outbreaks – United States, 2009–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2013; 62: 448452.
2. Scallan, E, et al. Foodborne illness acquired in the United States – major pathogens. Emerging Infectious Disease 2011; 17: 715.
3. Silk, BJ, et al. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals. Clinical Infectious Disease 2014; 59: 532540.
4. Goulet, V, et al. Incidence of listeriosis and related mortality among groups at risk for acquiring listeriosis. Clinical Infectious Disease 2012; 54: 652660.
5. Swaminathan, B, et al. Manual of Clinical Microbiology. New York City: ASM Press, 1995, pp. 341348.
6. Lake, R, Cressey, P, Hudson, A. Risk Profile: Listeria Monocytogenes in ice cream. Institute of Environmental Science & Research Limited (http://www.foodsafety.govt.nz/). Accessed 12 June 2015.
7. Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Food safety guidelines (http://www.seattlecca.org/food-safety-guidelines.cfm). Accessed 12 June 2015.
8. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Listeria (http://www.foodsafety.gov/poisoning/causes/bacteriaviruses/listeria/index.html). Accessed 12 June 2015.
9. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Food safety: it's especially important for at-risk groups (http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/PeopleAtRisk/ucm352830.htm). Accessed 12 June 2015.
10. Miettinen, M, Bjorkroth, K, Korkeala, H. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from an ice cream plant by serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. International Journal of Food Microbiology 1999; 43: 187192.
11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Enteric Disease Surveillance: The Listeria Initiative (http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/pdf/ListeriaInitiativeOverview_508.pdf). Accessed 12 June 2015.
12. Tenover, FC, et al. Interpreting chromosomal DNA restriction patterns produced by pulse-filed gel electrophoresis: criteria for bacterial strain typing. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 1995; 33: 22332239.
13. Goering, RV, Tenover, FC. Letter to the Editor. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 1997; 35: 24322433.
14. Gautom, RK. Rapid pulsed-field gel electrophoresis protocol for typing of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other gram-negative organisms in 1 day. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 1997; 35: 29772980.
15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multistate outbreak of listeriosis linked to Blue Bell Creameries products (http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/outbreaks/ice-cream-03-15/index.html). Accessed 25 June 2015.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed