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A one-year study of streptococcal infections and their complications among Ethiopian children

  • W. Tewodros (a1), L. Muhe (a2), E. Daniel (a2), C. Schalén (a3) and G. Kronvall (a4)...

Summary

Post-streptococcal complications are known to be common among Ethiopian children. Little is known, however, about the epidemiology of beta-haemolytic streptococci in Ethiopia. A total of 816 children were studied during a one-year period: 24 cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), 44 chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD), 44 acute post streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), 143 tonsillitis, 55 impetigo, and 506 were apparently healthy children. Both ARF and APSGN occurred throughout the year with two peaks during the rainy and cold seasons. The female: male ratio among ARF patients was 1·4:1 and 1:1·9 among APSGN. The monthly carrier rate of beta-haemolytic streptococci group A varied from 7·5–39%, average being 17%. T type 2 was the most frequent serotype. Marked seasonal fluctuations were noted in the distribution of serogroups among apparently healthy children. Beta-haemolytic streptococci group A dominated during the hot and humid months of February–May. Strains were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, except for tetracycline.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*W. Tewodros. Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, P.O. Box 60500, S-104 01, Stockholm, Sweden

References

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