Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Nutritional status and delayed mortality following early exposure to measles

  • P. Aaby (a1), M. Andersen (a1) (a2) and K. Knudsen (a1)

Summary

Community studies in Guinea-Bissau have found that exposure to measles prior to 6 months of age is associated with delayed mortality later in childhood. In an attempt to understand the underlying mechanism, we examined the role of pre-exposure nutritional status and the impact of exposure to measles on growth and subsequent mortality in these outbreaks. Though exposed children were lighter than controls, there was no association between pre-exposure weight-for-age and subsequent mortality adjusting for age. Although exposure was strongly associated with excess mortality, it did not have a negative impact on growth. Adjustment for state of nutrition did not alter the mortality ratio (MR) between 6 and 59 months of age for exposed children and controls; exposed children examined anthropometrically between 6–17 months had a MR of 3·70 compared with controls. This trend was the same for anthropometric measurements obtained at 18–59 months of age. Among the controls, there was a significant association between weight-for-age and subsequent mortality to the age of 5 years. However, for exposed children there was no association; the relation between weight-for-age and subsequent mortality was significantly different for exposed children compared with controls (tests for interaction between exposure and anthropometric measurements at 6–17 months: P = 0·05). Growth faltering as a consequence of early exposure to measles does not explain the marked excess mortality among these children. Further studies of the process underlying delayed mortality after early exposure to measles are warranted.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Nutritional status and delayed mortality following early exposure to measles
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Nutritional status and delayed mortality following early exposure to measles
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Nutritional status and delayed mortality following early exposure to measles
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
1.Aaby, P, Bukh, J, Kronborg, D, Lisse, IM, da Silva, MC. Delayed excess mortality after exposure to measles during the first six months of life. Am J Epidemiol 1990; 132: 211–9.
2.Hull, HF, Williams, PJ, Oldfield, F. Measles mortality and vaccine efficacy in rural West Africa. Lancet 1983; 1: 972–5.
3.Aaby, P, Andersen, M, Knudsen, K. Excess mortality after early exposure to measles. Int J Epidemiol 1993; 22: 156–62.
4.Aaby, P, Bukh, J, Hoff, G et al. , High measles mortality in infancy related to intensity of exposure. J Pediatr 1986; 109: 40–4.
5.Knudsen, K, Aaby, P, Whittle, H et al. , Child mortality following low, medium and high litre measles vaccination in West Africa. Int J Epidemiol 1996; 25: 665–73.
6.Aaby, P, Knudsen, K, Whittle, H et al. , Long-term survival after Edmonston–Zagreb measles vaccination: Increased female mortality. J Pediatr 1993; 122: 904–8.
7.Aaby, P, Samb, B, Simondon, F et al. , Sex specific mortality after high litre measles vaccines in rural Senegal. Bull WHO 1994; 72: 761–70.
8.Aaby, P, Bukh, J, Lisse, IM et al. , Overcrowding and intensive exposure as determinants of measles mortality. Am J Epidemiol 1984; 120: 4963.
9.Aaby, P, Pedersen, IR, Knudsen, K et al. , Child mortality related to seroconversion or lack of seroconversion after measles vaccination. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1989; 8: 197200.
10.Aaby, P, Knudsen, K, Jensen, TG et al. , Measles incidence, vaccine efficacy and mortality in two urban African areas with high vaccination coverage. J Infect Dis 1990; 162: 1043–8.
11.Aaby, P, Bukh, J, Lisse, IM et al. , Measles mortality, state of nutrition, and family structure: A community sludy from Guinea-Bissau. J Infect Dis 1983; 147: 693701.
12.Aaby, P, Bukh, J, Lisse, IM et al. , Measles vaccination and reduction in child mortalily: a community study from Guinea-Bissau. J Infect 1984; 8: 1321.
13.Sullivan, KM, Gorstein, J. Anthro. Software for calculating pediatric anthropomelry. Atlanta: CDC and Geneva: WHO, 1990.
14.Cox, DR. Regression models and life tables (with discussion). J R Slat Soc B 1972; 34: 187220.
15.Beau, JP, Garenne, M, Diop, B, Briend, A, Diop, Mar I. Diarrhoea and nutritional slalus as risk faclors of child mortality in a Dakar hospital (Senegal). J Trop Pediatr 1987; 33: 49.
16.Murray, J, Murray, A. Suppression of infection by famine and its activation by refeeding–A paradox? Perspect Biol Med 1977; 20: 471–83.
17.Aaby, P, Samb, B, Andersen, M, Simondon, F. No long-term excess mortality after measles infection: A com-munity study from Senegal. Am J Epidemiol 1996; 143: 1035–41.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed