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Multivariate analysis of factors affecting the immunogenicity of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in school-age children

  • G. FREEMAN (a1), S. NG (a2), R. A. P. M. PERERA (a3) (a4), V. J. FANG (a1), D. K. M. IP (a1), G. M. LEUNG (a5), J. S. M. PEIRIS (a3) (a4) and B. J. COWLING (a1)...

Summary

We examined factors affecting the immunogenicity of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination (TIV) in children using the antibody titres of children participating in a Hong Kong community-based study. Antibody titres of strains included in the 2009–2010 northern hemisphere TIV [seasonal A(H1N1), seasonal A(H3N2) and B (Victoria lineage)] and those not included in the TIV [2009 pandemic A(H1N1) and B (Yamagata lineage)] were measured by haemagglutination inhibition immediately before and 1 month after vaccination. Multivariate regression models were fitted in a Bayesian framework to characterize the distribution of changes in antibody titres following vaccination. Statistically significant rises in geometric mean antibody titres were observed against all strains, with a wide variety of standard deviations and correlations in rises observed, with the influenza type B antibodies showing more variability than the type A antibodies. The dynamics of antibody titres after vaccination can be used in more complex models of antibody dynamics in populations.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr G. Freeman, School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Units 624-7, Core F, Cyberport 3, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. (Email: gfreeman@hku.hk)

References

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