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A multi-state outbreak of Salmonella serotype Thompson infection from commercially distributed bread contaminated by an ill food handler

  • A. C. KIMURA (a1), M. S. PALUMBO (a2), H. MEYERS (a3), S. ABBOTT (a4), R. RODRIGUEZ (a5) and S. B. WERNER (a6)...

Abstract

Foodborne transmission is estimated to account for 95% of non-typhoidal Salmonella infections reported in the United States; however, outbreaks of salmonellosis are rarely traced to food handlers. In August 2000, an increase in Salmonella serotype Thompson infection was noted in Southern California; most of the cases reported eating at a restaurant chain (Chain A) before illness onset. A case-control study implicated the consumption of burgers at Chain A restaurants. The earliest onset of illness was in a burger bun packer at Bakery B who had not eaten at Chain A but had worked while ill. Bakery B supplied burger buns to some Chain A restaurants in Southern California and Arizona. This outbreak is notable for implicating a food handler as the source of food contamination and for involving bread, a very unusual outbreak vehicle for Salmonella. Inadequate food-handler training as well as delayed reporting to the health department contributed to this outbreak.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Infectious Diseases Branch, California Department of Health Services, 19300 S. Hamilton Ave, Ste 140; Gardena, CA 90248, USA. (Email: akimura@dhs.ca.gov)

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A multi-state outbreak of Salmonella serotype Thompson infection from commercially distributed bread contaminated by an ill food handler

  • A. C. KIMURA (a1), M. S. PALUMBO (a2), H. MEYERS (a3), S. ABBOTT (a4), R. RODRIGUEZ (a5) and S. B. WERNER (a6)...

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