Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Multiple high-risk HPV genotypes are grouped by type and are associated with viral load and risk factors

  • L. DEL RÍO-OSPINA (a1) (a2), S. C. SOTO-DE LEÓN (a1) (a3), M. CAMARGO (a1) (a4), R. SÁNCHEZ (a1) (a2), D. A. MORENO-PÉREZ (a1) (a4), A. PÉREZ-PRADOS (a5), M. E. PATARROYO (a1) (a2) and M. A. PATARROYO (a1) (a6)...

Summary

Investigating whether high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types tend to become grouped in a particular way and whether factors are associated with such grouping is important for measuring the real impact of vaccination. In total, 219 women proving positive for HPV as detected by real-time PCR were included in the study. Each sample was analysed for detecting and quantifying six viral types and the hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene. Multiple correspondence analysis led to determining grouping patterns for six HR-HPV types and simultaneous association with multiple variables and whether viral load was related to the coexistence of other viral types. Two grouping profiles were identified: the first included HPV-16 and HPV-45 and the second profile was represented by HPV-31, HPV-33 and HPV-58. Variables such as origin, contraceptive method, births and pregnancies, educational level, healthcare affiliation regime, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and viral load were associated with these grouping profiles. Different socio-demographic characteristics were found when coinfection occurred by phylogenetically related HPV types and when coinfection was due to non-related types. Biological characteristics, the number of viral copies, temporality regarding acquiring infection and competition between viral types could influence the configuration of grouping patterns. Characteristics related to women and HPV, influence such interactions between coexisting HPV types reflecting the importance of their evaluation.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Multiple high-risk HPV genotypes are grouped by type and are associated with viral load and risk factors
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Multiple high-risk HPV genotypes are grouped by type and are associated with viral load and risk factors
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Multiple high-risk HPV genotypes are grouped by type and are associated with viral load and risk factors
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: M. A. Patarroyo, Molecular Biology and Immunology Department, Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Cra 50 # 26-20, Bogotá, Colombia. (Email: mapatarr.fidic@gmail.com)

References

Hide All
1. Bosch, FX, et al. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. Journal of Clinical Pathology 2002; 55: 244265.
2. Liaw, KL, et al. A prospective study of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction and its association with acquisition and persistence of other HPV types. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2001; 183: 815.
3. Mendez, F, et al. Cervical coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types and possible implications for the prevention of cervical cancer by HPV vaccines. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2005; 192: 11581165.
4. Thomas, KK, et al. Concurrent and sequential acquisition of different genital human papillomavirus types. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2000; 182: 10971102.
5. Chaturvedi, AK, et al. Human papillomavirus infection with multiple types: pattern of coinfection and risk of cervical disease. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2011; 203: 910920.
6. Cuschieri, KS, et al. Multiple high risk HPV infections are common in cervical neoplasia and young women in a cervical screening population. Journal of Clinical Pathology 2004; 57: 6872.
7. Garcia, DA, et al. Highly sensitive detection and genotyping of HPV by PCR multiplex and Luminex technology in a cohort of Colombian women with abnormal cytology. Open Virology Journal 2011; 5: 7079.
8. Chaturvedi, AK, et al. Prevalence and clustering patterns of human papillomavirus genotypes in multiple infections. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention: A Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 2005; 14: 24392445.
9. Trottier, H, et al. Human papillomavirus infections with multiple types and risk of cervical neoplasia. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention: A Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 2006; 15: 12741280.
10. Vaccarella, S, et al. Clustering of multiple human papillomavirus infections in women from a population-based study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2011; 204: 385390.
11. Camargo, M, et al. Frequency of human papillomavirus infection, coinfection, and association with different risk factors in Colombia. Annals of Epidemiology 2011; 21: 204213.
12. Soto-De Leon, SC, et al. Persistence, clearance and reinfection regarding six high risk human papillomavirus types in Colombian women: a follow-up study. BMC Infect Dis 2014; 14: 395.
13. Carcopino, X, et al. Determination of HPV type 16 and 18 viral load in cervical smears of women referred to colposcopy. Journal of Medical Virology 2006; 78: 11311140.
14. Escofier, B, Pagès, J. Análisis factoriales simples y múltiples: objetivos, métodos e interpretación. España: Universidad del País Vasco, 1992, p. 286.
15. Lebart, L, Morineau, A, Piron, M. Statistique Exploratoire Multidimensionnelle. Paris: Dunod, 1995, p. 439.
16. Mejlhede, N, et al. Multiple human papilloma virus types in cervical infections: competition or synergy? APMIS: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, et Immunologica Scandinavica 2010; 118: 346352.
17. Dickson, EL, et al. Cervical cytology and multiple type HPV infection: a study of 8182 women ages 31–65. Gynecologic Oncology 2014; 133: 405408.
18. Dickson, EL, et al. Multiple-type human papillomavirus (HPV) infections: a cross-sectional analysis of the prevalence of specific types in 309 000 women referred for HPV testing at the time of cervical cytology. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer: Official Journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society 2013; 23: 12951302.
19. Murall, CL, McCann, KS, Bauch, CT. Revising ecological assumptions about Human papillomavirus interactions and type replacement. Journal of Theoretical Biology 2014; 350: 98109.
20. Xi, LF, et al. Human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 DNA load in relation to coexistence of other types, particularly those in the same species. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention: A Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 2009; 18: 25072512.
21. McCarthy, C, Youde, SJ, Man, S. Definition of an HPV18/45 cross-reactive human T-cell epitope after DNA immunisation of HLA-A2/KB transgenic mice. International Journal of Cancer Journal International du Cancer 2006; 118: 25142521.
22. Rousseau, MC, et al. Occurrence of cervical infection with multiple human papillomavirus types is associated with age and cytologic abnormalities. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2003; 30: 581587.
23. Clifford, G, Franceschi, S. Members of the human papillomavirus type 18 family (alpha-7 species) share a common association with adenocarcinoma of the cervix. International Journal of Cancer 2008; 122: 16841685.
24. Zhang, R, et al. Risk factors for human papillomavirus infection in Shanghai suburbs: a population-based study with 10 000 women. Journal of Clinical Virology: The Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology 2013; 58: 144148.
25. Castellsague, X, Bosch, FX, Munoz, N. Environmental co-factors in HPV carcinogenesis. Virus Research 2002; 89: 191199.
26. Guerrero, R, et al. Sistema de salud de Colombia. Salud Pública de México 2011; 53: 144155.
27. Ferlay, J. Cancer Incidence and Mortality Worldwide: IARC Cancer Base No. 11. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2013.
28. Schluterman, NH, et al. Differences in patterns of high-risk human papillomavirus infection between urban and rural low-resource settings: cross-sectional findings from Mali. BMC Women's Health 2013; 13: 19.
29. Goodman, MT, et al. Hawaii cohort study of serum micronutrient concentrations and clearance of incident oncogenic human papillomavirus infection of the cervix. Cancer Research 2007; 67: 59875996.
30. Hernández-Hernández, DM, et al. Association between high-risk human papillomavirus DNA load and precursor lesions of cervical cancer in Mexican women. Gynecologic Oncology 2003; 90: 310317.
31. Josefsson, AM, et al. Viral load of human papilloma virus 16 as a determinant for development of cervical carcinoma in situ: a nested case-control study. Lancet 2000; 355: 21892193.
32. Moberg, M, et al. High viral loads of human papillomavirus predict risk of invasive cervical carcinoma. British Journal of Cancer 2005; 92: 891894.
33. Ylitalo, N, et al. Consistent high viral load of human papillomavirus 16 and risk of cervical carcinoma in situ: a nested case-control study. Lancet 2000; 355: 21942198.
34. Bello, BD, et al. Cervical infections by multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes: prevalence and impact on the risk of precancerous epithelial lesions. Journal of Medical Virology 2009; 81: 703712.
35. Schmitt, M, et al. Viral load of high-risk human papillomaviruses as reliable clinical predictor for the presence of cervical lesions. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention: A Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 2013; 22: 406414.
36. Spinillo, A, et al. Multiple human papillomavirus infection and high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia among women with cytological diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. Gynecologic Oncology 2009; 113: 115119.
37. Soto-De Leon, S, et al. Distribution patterns of infection with multiple types of human papillomaviruses and their association with risk factors. PloS ONE 2011; 6: e14705.
38. Del Rio-Ospina, L, et al. The prevalence of high-risk HPV types and factors determining infection in female Colombian adolescents. PloS ONE 2016; 11: e0166502.
39. Rousseau, MC, et al. Cervical coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types as a predictor of acquisition and persistence of HPV infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2001; 184: 15081517.
40. Tota, JE, et al. Epidemiologic approaches to evaluating the potential for human papillomavirus type replacement postvaccination. American Journal of Epidemiology 2013; 178: 625634.

Keywords

Multiple high-risk HPV genotypes are grouped by type and are associated with viral load and risk factors

  • L. DEL RÍO-OSPINA (a1) (a2), S. C. SOTO-DE LEÓN (a1) (a3), M. CAMARGO (a1) (a4), R. SÁNCHEZ (a1) (a2), D. A. MORENO-PÉREZ (a1) (a4), A. PÉREZ-PRADOS (a5), M. E. PATARROYO (a1) (a2) and M. A. PATARROYO (a1) (a6)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed