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Modifiable diarrhoea risk factors in Egyptian children aged <5 years

  • A. M. MANSOUR (a1), H. EL MOHAMMADY (a1), M. EL SHABRAWI (a2), S. Y. SHABAAN (a3), M. ABOU ZEKRI (a2), M. NASSAR (a3), M. E. SALEM (a2), M. MOSTAFA (a1), M. S. RIDDLE (a4), J. D. KLENA (a1), I. A. ABDEL MESSIH (a5), S. LEVIN (a1) and S. Y. N. YOUNG (a6)...

Summary

By conducting a case-control study in two university hospitals, we explored the association between modifiable risk behaviours and diarrhoea. Children aged <5 years attending outpatient clinics for diarrhoea were matched by age and sex with controls. Data were collected on family demographics, socioeconomic indicators, and risk behaviour practices. Two rectal swabs and a stool specimen were collected from cases and controls. Samples were cultured for bacterial pathogens using standard techniques and tested by ELISA to detect rotavirus and Cryptosporidium spp. Four hundred cases and controls were enrolled between 2007 and 2009. The strongest independent risk factors for diarrhoea were: presence of another household member with diarrhoea [matched odds ratio (mOR) 4·9, 95% CI 2·8–8·4] in the week preceding the survey, introduction to a new kind of food (mOR 3, 95% CI 1·7–5·4), and the child being cared for outside home (mOR 2·6, 95% CI 1·3–5·2). While these risk factors are not identifiable, in some age groups more easily modifiable risk factors were identified including: having no soap for handwashing (mOR 6·3, 95% CI 1·2–33·9) for children aged 7–12 months, and pacifier use (mOR 1·9, 95% CI 1·0–3·5) in children aged 0–6 months. In total, the findings of this study suggest that community-based interventions to improve practices related to sanitation and hygiene, handwashing and food could be utilized to reduce the burden of diarrhoea in Egyptian children aged <5 years.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr A. M. Mansour, NAMRU-3, PSC 452, Box 5000, FPO AE 09835. (Email: Adel.mansour.eg@med.navy.mil)

References

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Keywords

Modifiable diarrhoea risk factors in Egyptian children aged <5 years

  • A. M. MANSOUR (a1), H. EL MOHAMMADY (a1), M. EL SHABRAWI (a2), S. Y. SHABAAN (a3), M. ABOU ZEKRI (a2), M. NASSAR (a3), M. E. SALEM (a2), M. MOSTAFA (a1), M. S. RIDDLE (a4), J. D. KLENA (a1), I. A. ABDEL MESSIH (a5), S. LEVIN (a1) and S. Y. N. YOUNG (a6)...

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