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The magnitude and distribution of infectious intestinal disease in Malta: a population-based study

  • C. GAUCI (a1), H. GILLES (a2), S. O'BRIEN (a3), J. MAMO (a4), I. STABILE (a4), F. M. RUGGERI (a5), A. GATT (a1), N. CALLEJA (a6) and G. SPITERI (a1)...

Summary

Routine sources of information on infectious intestinal disease (IID) capture a fraction of the actual disease burden. Population studies are required to measure the burden of illness. A retrospective age-stratified cross-sectional telephone study was carried out in Malta in order to estimate the magnitude and distribution of IID at population level. A random sample of 3504 persons was interviewed by a structured questionnaire between April 2004 and December 2005. The response rate was 99·7%. From the study, the observed standardized monthly prevalence was 3·18% (95% CI 0·7–5·74) with 0·421 (95% CI 0·092–0·771) episodes of IID per person per year. The monthly prevalence was higher in the <5 years age group and in females aged 31–44 years. The mean duration of illness was 6·8 days and a median duration of 3 days. A bimodal seasonal distribution was observed with peaks in June–July and October–November.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr C. Gauci, Head of Disease Surveillance Unit, Disease Surveillance Unit, Public Health Department, 37-39 Rue D'Argens, Msida, Malta. (Email: charmaine.gauci@gov.mt)

References

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The magnitude and distribution of infectious intestinal disease in Malta: a population-based study

  • C. GAUCI (a1), H. GILLES (a2), S. O'BRIEN (a3), J. MAMO (a4), I. STABILE (a4), F. M. RUGGERI (a5), A. GATT (a1), N. CALLEJA (a6) and G. SPITERI (a1)...

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