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Invasive pneumococcal disease in hospitalised children from Lima, Peru before and after introduction of the 7-valent conjugated vaccine

  • A. Luna-Muschi (a1) (a2), F. Castillo-Tokumori (a1) (a2), M. P. Deza (a1) (a2), E. H. Mercado (a1) (a2), M. Egoavil (a1) (a2), K. Sedano (a1) (a2), M. E. Castillo (a1) (a2) (a3), I. Reyes (a2) (a4), E. Chaparro (a1) (a2) (a5), R. Hernández (a1) (a2) (a5), W. Silva (a2) (a6), O. Del Aguila (a2) (a6), F. Campos (a2) (a7), A. Saenz (a2) (a8) and T. J. Ochoa (a1) (a2) (a9)...

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) strains in children from Lima, Peru, before and after the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), which was introduced in the national immunisation program on 2009. We conducted a prospective, multicentre, passive surveillance IPD study during 2006–2008 and 2009–2011, before and right after the introduction of PCV7 in Peru. The study was performed in 11 hospitals and five private laboratories in Lima, Peru, in patients <18 years old, with sterile site cultures yielding Streptococcus pneumoniae. In total 159 S. pneumoniae isolates were recovered. There was a decrease in the incidence of IPD in children <2 years old after the introduction of PCV7 (18.4/100 000 vs. 5.1/100 000, P = 0.004). Meningitis cases decreased significantly in the second period (P = 0.036) as well as the overall case fatality rate (P = 0.025), including a decreased case fatality rate of pneumonia (16.3% to 0%, P = 0.04). PCV7 serotypes showed a downward trend. Vaccine-preventable serotypes caused 78.9% of IPD cases, mainly 14, 6B, 5, 19F and 23F. A non-significant increase in erythromycin resistance was reported. Our findings suggest that the introduction of PCV7 led to a significant decrease of IPD in children under 2 years old and in the overall case fatality rate.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: T. J. Ochoa, E-mail: Theresa.Ochoa@upch.pe; Theresa.J.Ochoa@uth.tmc.edu

References

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Keywords

Invasive pneumococcal disease in hospitalised children from Lima, Peru before and after introduction of the 7-valent conjugated vaccine

  • A. Luna-Muschi (a1) (a2), F. Castillo-Tokumori (a1) (a2), M. P. Deza (a1) (a2), E. H. Mercado (a1) (a2), M. Egoavil (a1) (a2), K. Sedano (a1) (a2), M. E. Castillo (a1) (a2) (a3), I. Reyes (a2) (a4), E. Chaparro (a1) (a2) (a5), R. Hernández (a1) (a2) (a5), W. Silva (a2) (a6), O. Del Aguila (a2) (a6), F. Campos (a2) (a7), A. Saenz (a2) (a8) and T. J. Ochoa (a1) (a2) (a9)...

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