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Intestinal parasitism and Vibrio cholerae infection among diarrhoeal patients in Kolkata, India

  • D. R. SAHA (a1), K. RAJENDRAN (a1), T. RAMAMURTHY (a1), R. K. NANDY (a1) and S. K. BHATTACHARYA (a1)...

Summary

In this study, we have analysed the epidemiological significance of the concurrent infections caused by Vibrio cholerae and intestinal parasites among different age groups of hospitalized diarrhoeal patients in Kolkata. A total of 3556 stool samples collected during 1996–2004 were screened for vibrios and parasites. The seasonality of V. cholerae and parasitic infections were studied in detail. The detection rates for Ascaris lumbricoides and Giardia lamblia infection were more than for the hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Entamoeba histolytica. V. cholerae O1 was identified as the predominant serogroup among diarrhoeal patients. The highest rates for V. cholerae infection were in the 2–5 years age group and combined infection of V. cholerae and parasites was recorded among children aged between 2 and 10 years.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr D. R. Saha, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, P-33, C.I.T. Road, Scheme XM, Beliaghata, Kolkata 700010, India. (Email: sahadr@yahoo.co.uk)

References

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