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The intermittent use of hexachlorophene soap—a controlled trial

  • J. A. C. Weatherall (a1) and H. I. Winner (a1)

Extract

The number of bacteria on the hands of nurses using 2 % hexachlorophene soap intermittently was compared with the numbers of bacteria on the hands of nurses using ordinary soap. No significant differences were observed.

This study would not have been possible without the whole-hearted co-operation of the Matron, Miss M. Schurr, the Deputy Matron, Miss G. Davies and the Sisters and Nursing Staff of Fulham Hospital.

We are also indebted to Mr T. Ridgewell, Mr T. F. Fletcher and Miss Julia Fisher for technical assistance, and to Messers Bibby and Co. For their generous gift of soap.

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References

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Lawrie, P. & Jones, B. (1952). Hexachlorophene soap effect on the bacterial flora of the hands. Pharm. J. 168, 288.
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Lowbury, E. J. L., Lilly, H. A. & Bull, J. P. (1963). Disinfection of the hands: removal of resident bacteria. Brit. med. J. i, 1251.
Price, P. B. (1938). The bacteriology of normal skin; a new quantitative test applied to a study of the bacterial flora and the disinfectant action of mechanical cleansing. J. infect. Dis. 63, 301.
Price, P. B. & Bonnet, A. (1948). The antibacterial effects of G5, G11 and A151 with special reference to their use in the production of a germicidal soap. Surgery, 24, 542.
Traub, E. F., Newhall, C. A. & Fuller, J. R. (1944). The value of a new compound used in soap to reduce the bacterial flora of the human skin. Surg. Gynec. Obstet. 79, 205.

The intermittent use of hexachlorophene soap—a controlled trial

  • J. A. C. Weatherall (a1) and H. I. Winner (a1)

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