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Increased incidence of serotype-1 invasive pneumococcal disease in young female adults in The Netherlands

  • S. P. VAN MENS (a1) (a2), A. M. M. VAN DEURSEN (a2) (a3), S. C. A. MEIJVIS (a1) (a2), B. J. M. VLAMINCKX (a1), E. A. M. SANDERS (a2), H. E. DE MELKER (a4), L. M. SCHOULS (a4), A. VAN DER ENDE (a5) (a6), S. C. DE GREEFF (a4) and G. T. RIJKERS (a1) (a7)...

Summary

Analysis of the Dutch national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance data by sex reveals an increase in the incidence of serotype-1 disease in young female adults in The Netherlands after the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the national immunization schedule. This has led to an overall increase in IPD in women aged 20–45 years, which was not observed in men of the same age. No other differences in serotype shifts possibly induced by the introduction of PCV7 were observed between the sexes in this age group. Serotype 1 is a naturally fluctuating serotype in Europe and it has been associated with disease in young healthy adults before. It remains uncertain whether or not there is an association between the observed increase in serotype-1 disease in young female adults and the implementation of PCV7 in The Netherlands.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Mrs S. P. van Mens, Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology, St Antonius Hospital, PO Box 2500, 3430 EM Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. (Email: S.van.mens@antoniusziekenhuis.nl)

References

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Keywords

Increased incidence of serotype-1 invasive pneumococcal disease in young female adults in The Netherlands

  • S. P. VAN MENS (a1) (a2), A. M. M. VAN DEURSEN (a2) (a3), S. C. A. MEIJVIS (a1) (a2), B. J. M. VLAMINCKX (a1), E. A. M. SANDERS (a2), H. E. DE MELKER (a4), L. M. SCHOULS (a4), A. VAN DER ENDE (a5) (a6), S. C. DE GREEFF (a4) and G. T. RIJKERS (a1) (a7)...

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