Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Increased incidence of Campylobacter jejuni-associated Guillain–Barré syndromes in the Greater Paris area

  • V. SIVADON-TARDY (a1), R. PORCHER (a2), D. ORLIKOWSKI (a3), E. RONCO (a3), E. GAULT (a1), J. ROUSSI (a3), M.-C. DURAND (a3), T. SHARSHAR (a3), D. ANNANE (a3), J.-C. RAPHAEL (a3), F. MEGRAUD (a4) and J.-L. GAILLARD (a1) (a3)...

Summary

The role of Campylobacter jejuni as the triggering agent of Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) has not been reassessed since the end of the 1990s in France. We report that the number of C. jejuni-related GBS cases increased continuously between 1996 and 2007 in the Paris region (mean annual increment: 7%, P = 0·007).

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Increased incidence of Campylobacter jejuni-associated Guillain–Barré syndromes in the Greater Paris area
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Increased incidence of Campylobacter jejuni-associated Guillain–Barré syndromes in the Greater Paris area
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Increased incidence of Campylobacter jejuni-associated Guillain–Barré syndromes in the Greater Paris area
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr V. Sivadon-Tardy, Laboratoire de Microbiologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, 9 Avenue Charles de Gaulle, 92104 Boulogne Cedex, France. (Email: valerie.sivadon-tardy@apr.aphp.fr) [V.S-T.] (Email: jean-louis.gaillard@apr.aphp.fr) [J-L.G.]

References

Hide All
1.Hughes, RA, Rees, JH. Clinical and epidemiologic features of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Journal of Infectious Diseases 1997; 176 (Suppl. 2): S9298.
2.Rees, JH, et al. Campylobacter jejuni infection and Guillain-Barré syndrome. New England Journal of Medicine 1995; 333: 13741379.
3.Hadden, RD, et al. Preceding infections, immune factors, and outcome in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Neurology 2001; 56: 758765.
4.Van, Koningsveld R, et al. Mild forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome in an epidemiologic survey in The Netherlands. Neurology 2000; 54: 620625.
5.Sivadon-Tardy, V, et al. Guillain-Barré syndrome, greater Paris area. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2006; 12: 990993.
6.Plasma Exchange Sandoglobulin Guillain-Barré Syndrome Trial Group. Randomised trial of plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and combined treatments in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Lancet 1997; 349: 225230.
7.Sivadon-Tardy, V, et al. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni by culture and real-time PCR in a French cohort of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2010; 48: 22782281.
8.Sivadon-Tardy, V, et al. Guillain-Barré syndrome and influenza virus infection. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2009; 48: 4856.
9.Orlikowski, D, et al. Guillain-Barré syndrome following primary cytomegalovirus infection: a prospective cohort study. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2011; 52: 837844.
10.Jones, RH, Ford, PM, Hamman, RF. Seasonality comparisons among groups using incidence data. Biometrics 1988; 44: 11311144.
11.Nylen, G, et al. The seasonal distribution of campylobacter infection in nine European countries and New Zealand. Epidemiology and Infection 2002; 128: 383390.
12.Altekruse, SF, et al. Campylobacter jejuni – an emerging foodborne pathogen. Emerging Infectious Diseases 1999; 5: 2835.
13.Gallay, A, et al. Risk factors for acquiring sporadic Campylobacter infection in France: results from a national case-control study. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2008; 197: 14771484.
14.Tauxe, RV, et al. Campylobacter isolates in the United States, 1982–1986. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. CDC Surveillance Summaries 1988; 37: 113.
15.Taylor, EV, et al. Common source outbreaks of Campylobacter infection in the USA, 1997–2008. Epidemiology and Infection 2012; 15: 110.
16.Baker, M, et al. Declining Guillain-Barré syndrome after campylobacteriosis control, New-Zealand, 1988–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2012; 18: 226233.

Keywords

Increased incidence of Campylobacter jejuni-associated Guillain–Barré syndromes in the Greater Paris area

  • V. SIVADON-TARDY (a1), R. PORCHER (a2), D. ORLIKOWSKI (a3), E. RONCO (a3), E. GAULT (a1), J. ROUSSI (a3), M.-C. DURAND (a3), T. SHARSHAR (a3), D. ANNANE (a3), J.-C. RAPHAEL (a3), F. MEGRAUD (a4) and J.-L. GAILLARD (a1) (a3)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed