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Hospital-acquired listeriosis linked to a persistently contaminated milkshake machine

  • E. MAZENGIA (a1), V. KAWAKAMI (a2) (a3), K. RIETBERG (a2), M. KAY (a2), P. WYMAN (a1), C. SKILTON (a1), A. ABERRA (a4), J. BOONYARATANAKORNKIT (a4), A. P. LIMAYE (a4), S. A. PERGAM (a4) (a5), E. WHIMBEY (a4), R. J. OLSEN-SCRIBNER (a4) and J. S. DUCHIN (a2) (a4)...

Summary

One case of hospital-acquired listeriosis was linked to milkshakes produced in a commercial-grade shake freezer machine. This machine was found to be contaminated with a strain of Listeria monocytogenes epidemiologically and molecularly linked to a contaminated pasteurized, dairy-based ice cream product at the same hospital a year earlier, despite repeated cleaning and sanitizing. Healthcare facilities should be aware of the potential for prolonged Listeria contamination of food service equipment. In addition, healthcare providers should consider counselling persons who have an increased risk for Listeria infections regarding foods that have caused Listeria infections. The prevalence of persistent Listeria contamination of commercial-grade milkshake machines in healthcare facilities and the risk associated with serving dairy-based ice cream products to hospitalized patients at increased risk for invasive L. monocytogenes infections should be further evaluated.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr V. Kawakami, 401 5th Ave Suite 1200, Seattle, WA 98104, USA. (Email: vance.kawakami@kingcounty.gov) [V.K.] (Email: eyob.mazengia@kingcounty.gov) [E.M.]

References

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Keywords

Hospital-acquired listeriosis linked to a persistently contaminated milkshake machine

  • E. MAZENGIA (a1), V. KAWAKAMI (a2) (a3), K. RIETBERG (a2), M. KAY (a2), P. WYMAN (a1), C. SKILTON (a1), A. ABERRA (a4), J. BOONYARATANAKORNKIT (a4), A. P. LIMAYE (a4), S. A. PERGAM (a4) (a5), E. WHIMBEY (a4), R. J. OLSEN-SCRIBNER (a4) and J. S. DUCHIN (a2) (a4)...

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