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High prevalence of HIV infection among rural tea plantation residents in Kericho, Kenya

  • G. FOGLIA (a1), W. B. SATEREN (a2), P. O. RENZULLO (a3), C. T. BAUTISTA (a4), L. LANGAT (a1), M. K. WASUNNA (a5), D. E. SINGER (a2), P. T. SCOTT (a2), M. L. ROBB (a4) and D. L. BIRX (a2)...

Summary

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemiology among residents of a rural agricultural plantation in Kericho, Kenya was studied. HIV-1 prevalence was 14·3%, and was higher among women (19·1%) than men (11·3%). Risk factors associated with HIV-1 for men were age (⩾25 years), marital history (one or more marriages), age difference from current spouse (⩾5 years), Luo ethnicity, sexually transmitted infection (STI) symptoms in the past 6 months, circumcision (protective), and sexual activity (⩾7 years). Among women, risk factors associated with HIV-1 were age (25–29 years, ⩾35 years), marital history (one or more marriages), age difference from current spouse (⩾10 years), Luo ethnicity, STI symptoms in the past 6 months, and a STI history in the past 5 years. Most participants (96%) expressed a willingness to participate in a future HIV vaccine study. These findings will facilitate targeted intervention and prevention measures for HIV-1 infection in Kericho.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: W. B. Sateren, M.P.H, Division of Retrovirology, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 1 Taft Court, Suite 250, Rockville, MD 20850, USA. (Email: WSateren@hivresearch.org)

References

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