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Heat resistance of spores of Clostridium welchii*

  • Mitsuru Nakamura (a1) and James D. Converse (a1)

Extract

Eight strains of Cl. welchii were studied for the heat-resistance of their spores. Spores of Cl. welchii isolated from food-poisoning cases had greater heat-resistance than strains isolated from soil or faeces. D-values and trend values were calculated from the thermal death curves.

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References

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Heat resistance of spores of Clostridium welchii*

  • Mitsuru Nakamura (a1) and James D. Converse (a1)

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