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Genotype and genetic variation of HCV infections with low-risk factors in Putian coastal regions, China

  • X. M. LI (a1) (a2), R. X. QIU (a3), C. H. SONG (a4), Q. H. HUANG (a3), X. D. WANG (a5), Z. T. HU (a3), X. Z. HE (a3), X. Y. YE (a3), X. G. HUANG (a3), F. F. ZHENG (a3) and G. X. LIN (a3) (a6) (a7)...

Summary

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the leading causes of death and morbidity associated with liver disease. Risk factors identified for the transmission of HCV include contaminated blood products, intravenous drug use, body piercing, an infected mother at birth, sexual activity, and dental therapy, among others. However, the exact diversity of the HCV genotype and genetic variation among patients with low-risk factors is still unknown. In this study, we briefly described and analysed the genotype distribution and genetic variation of HCV infections with low-risk factors using molecular biology techniques. The results suggested that genotype 1b was predominant, followed by genotypes 2a and 1a. Genetic variations in the 5′ UTR sequences of HCV were identified, including point mutations, deletions, and insertions. The frequency of genetic variations in 1b was higher than in 2a. This study provides considerable value for the prevention and treatment of liver disease caused by HCV among patients with low-risk factors and for the development of HCV diagnostic reagents and vaccines.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: G. X. Lin, No. 999 East Dongzhen Road, Licheng District, Putian 351100, Fujian, China. (Email: lingx609@163.com)

Footnotes

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These authors contributed equally to this work.

Footnotes

References

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