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Factors related to the prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica on pig farms

  • S. E. VIRTANEN (a1), L. K. SALONEN (a2), R. LAUKKANEN (a1), M. HAKKINEN (a3) and H. KORKEALA (a1)...

Summary

A survey of 788 pigs from 120 farms was conducted to determine the within-farm prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and a questionnaire of management conditions was mailed to the farms afterwards. A univariate statistical analysis with carriage and shedding as outcomes was conducted with random-effects logistic regression with farm as a clustering factor. Variables with a P value <0·15 were included into the respective multivariate random-effects logistic regression model. The use of municipal water was discovered to be a protective factor against carriage and faecal shedding of the pathogen. Organic production and buying feed from a certain feed manufacturer were also protective against total carriage. Tonsillar carriage, a different feed manufacturer, fasting pigs before transport to the slaughterhouse, higher-level farm health classification, and snout contacts between pigs were risk factors for faecal shedding. We concluded that differences in management can explain different prevalences of Y. enterocolitica between farms.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: S. E. Virtanen, DVM, Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 66, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. (Email: sonja.virtanen@helsinki.fi)

References

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