Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Evaluation of enzyme immunoassays in the diagnosis of camel (Camelus dromedarius) trypanosomiasis: a preliminary investigation

  • P. F. Rae (a1), M. V. Thrusfield (a2), A. Higgins (a3), C. G. G. Aitken (a4), T. W. Jones (a1) and A. G. Luckins (a1)...

Summary

Three enzyme immunoassays were used for the serodiagnosis of Trypanosoma evansi in camels in the Sudan in order to evaluate their ability to discriminate between infected and non-infected animals. Two assays were used for the detection of trypanosomal antibodies, one using specific anti-camel IgG conjugate and another using a non-specific Protein A conjugate. The third assay detected the presence of trypanosomal antigens using anti-T. evansi antibodies in a double antibody sandwich assay. Inspection of the frequency distribution of assay results suggested that the ELISA for circulating trypanosomal antibodies using specific antisera and the ELISA for circulating antigens can distinguish between non-infected camels and infected camels exhibiting patent infections or not. The ELISA using Protein A conjugate to bind non-specifically to camel immunoglobulin did not appear to discriminate between infected and non-infected animals.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Evaluation of enzyme immunoassays in the diagnosis of camel (Camelus dromedarius) trypanosomiasis: a preliminary investigation
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Evaluation of enzyme immunoassays in the diagnosis of camel (Camelus dromedarius) trypanosomiasis: a preliminary investigation
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Evaluation of enzyme immunoassays in the diagnosis of camel (Camelus dromedarius) trypanosomiasis: a preliminary investigation
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Boid, R., Luckins, A. G., Rae, P. F., Gray, A. R., Mahmoud, M. M. & El Malik, K. H. (1980). Serum immunoglobulin levels and electrophoretic patterns of serum proteins in camels infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Veterinary Parasitology 6, 333345.
Boid, R., Jones, T. W. & Luckins, A. G. (1986). Protozoal diseases of camels. In The Camel in Health and Disease (ed. Higgins, A.), p. 44. London: Bailliere Tindall.
Godfrey, D. G. & Killick-Kendrick, R. (1962). Trypanosoma evansi of camels in Nigeria: a high incidence demonstrated by the inoculation of blood into rats. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 56, 1419.
Herbert, W. J. (1970). Veterinary Immunology, p. 190. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications Limited.
Lanham, S. M. & Godfrey, D. G. (1970). Isolation of salivarian trypanosomes from man and other animals using DEAE cellulose. Experimental Parasitology 28, 521534.
Luckins, A. G. (1977). Detection of antibodies in trypanosome infected cattle by means of a microplate enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Tropical Animal Health and Production 9, 5362.
Luckins, A. G. (1986). Antigens and antibodies in fungal and parasitic diseases. Trypanosoma brucei. In Methods in Enzymic Analysis, (ed. Masseyeff, R. F.), pp. 351367. Federal Republic of Germany: Vch Verlagsgesellschaft.
Luckins, A. G., Boid, R., Rae, P., Mahmoud, M. M., El Malik, K. H. & Gray, A. R. (1979).Serodiagnosis of infection with Trypanosoma evansi in camels in the Sudan. Tropical Animal Health and Production 11, 112.
Luckins, A. G., Gray, A. R. & Rae, P. (1978). Comparison of the diagnostic value of serum immunoglobulin levels, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescent antibody test in experimental infections with Trypanosoma evansi in rabbits. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 72, 429441.
Luckins, A. G. & Mehlitz, D. (1978). Evaluation of an indirect fluorescent antibody test, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and quantification of immunoglobulin in the diagnosis of bovine trypansomiasis. Tropical Animal Health and Production 10, 149159.
Rae, P. F. & Luckins, A. G. (1984). Detection of circulating trypanosomal antigens by enzyme immunoassay. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 78, 587596.
Ruitenberg, E. J., Van Amstel, J. A., Brosi, B. J. M. & Steerenberg, P. A. (1977). Mechanization of the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for large scale screening of sera. Journal of Immunological Methods 16, 351359.
Ryan, B. F., Joiner, B. L. & Ryan, T. A. (1985). Minitab Handbook, 2nd edition. Boston: Prindle, Weber and Schmidt.
Schoening, H. W. (1924). Trypanosomiasis in camels. Its detection by complement fixation. Journal of Infectious Diseases 34, 608613.
Thalhamer, J. & Freund, J. (1984). Cascade immunization: a method of obtaining polyspecific antisera against crude fractions of antigens. Journal of Immunological Methods 66, 245251.
Wilson, A. J., Schwartz, H. J., Dolan, Rosemary & Olahu, W. M. (1983). A simple classification of different types of trypanosomiasis occurring in four camel herds in selected areas of Kenya. Tropenmedizin und Parasitologie 34, 220224.
Wilson, M. B. & Nakane, P. K, (1978). Recent developments in the periodate method of conjugating horseradish peroxidase (HRPO) to antibodies. In Immunofluorescence and Related Staining Techniques. New York: Elsevier/North Holland Biochemical Press.
Woo, P. T. K. (1970). The haematocrit centrifuge technique for the diagnosis of African trypanosomiasis. Acta Tropica 27, 384386.
Zweygarth, E., Sabwa, C. & Röttcher, D. (1985). An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma (T.) brucei evansi in camels (Camelus dromedarius) using peroxidase-conjugated protein A. Tropenmedizin und Parasitologie 37, 105106.

Evaluation of enzyme immunoassays in the diagnosis of camel (Camelus dromedarius) trypanosomiasis: a preliminary investigation

  • P. F. Rae (a1), M. V. Thrusfield (a2), A. Higgins (a3), C. G. G. Aitken (a4), T. W. Jones (a1) and A. G. Luckins (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed