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Epidemiology of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in the two waves before and after October 2013 in Zhejiang province, China

  • X. Y. WANG (a1), C. L. CHAI (a1), F. D. LI (a1), F. HE (a1), Z. YU (a1), X. X. WANG (a1), X. P. SHANG (a1), S. L. LIU (a1) and J. F. LIN (a1)...

Summary

We compared the epidemiological and clinical features of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infections in the population in Zhejiang province, China, between March and April 2013 (first wave) and October 2013 and February 2014 (second wave). No statistical difference was found for age, sex, occupation, presence of underlying conditions, exposure history, white blood cell count, lymphocyte percentage and illness timeline and duration (all P > 0·05). The virus spread to 30 new counties compared to the first wave. The case-fatality rate was 22% in the first wave and 42% in the second (P = 0·023). Of those infected, 66% in the first wave and 62% in the second wave had underlying conditions. The proportion of those exposed to live poultry markets were 80% and 66%, respectively. We recommend permanent closure of live poultry markets and reformation of poultry supply and sales.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Professor Junfen Lin, Zhejiang Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, Binjiang District, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310051, People's Republic of China. (Email: jflin@cdc.zj.cn)

References

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