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Epidemiological concordance of Japanese encephalitis virus infection among mosquito vectors, amplifying hosts and humans in India

  • J. BORAH (a1), P. DUTTA (a1), S. A. KHAN (a1) and J. MAHANTA (a1)

Summary

A temporal relationship of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) transmission in pigs, mosquitoes and humans revealed that sentinel pig seroconversions were significantly associated with human cases 4 weeks before (P = 0·04) their occurrence, highly correlated during the same time and 2 weeks before case occurrence (P < 0·001), and remained significantly correlated up to 2 weeks after human case occurrence (P < 0·01). JEV was detected in the same month in pigs and mosquitoes, and peaks of pig seroconversion were preceded by 1–2 months of peaks of infection in vectors. Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that detection of JEV-positive mosquitoes was significantly associated with the median time to occurrence of seroconversion in pigs (P < 0·05). This study will not only help in predicting JEV activity but also accelerate timely vector control measures and vaccination programmes for pigs and humans to reduce the Japanese encephalitis risk in endemic areas.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr P. Dutta,Entomology and Filariasis Section, Regional Medical Research Centre, ICMR, Northeast Region, Post Box no. 105, Dibrugarh-786001, Assam, India. (Email: duttaprafulla@yahoo.com)

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