Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Economic principles for resource allocation decisions at national level to mitigate the effects of disease in farm animal populations

  • K. S. HOWE (a1), B. HÄSLER (a2) and K. D. C. STÄRK (a2)

Summary

This paper originated in a project to develop a practical, generic tool for the economic evaluation of surveillance for farm animal diseases at national level by a state veterinary service. Fundamental to that process is integration of epidemiological and economic perspectives. Using a generalized example of epidemic disease, we show that an epidemic curve maps into its economic equivalent, a disease mitigation function, that traces the relationship between value losses avoided and mitigation resources expended. Crucially, elementary economic principles show that mitigation, defined as loss reduction achieved by surveillance and intervention, must be explicitly conceptualized as a three-variable process, and the relative contributions of surveillance and intervention resources investigated with regard to the substitution possibilities between them. Modelling the resultant mitigation surfaces for different diseases should become a standard approach to animal health policy analysis for economic efficiency, a contribution to the evolving agenda for animal health economics research.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Economic principles for resource allocation decisions at national level to mitigate the effects of disease in farm animal populations
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Economic principles for resource allocation decisions at national level to mitigate the effects of disease in farm animal populations
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Economic principles for resource allocation decisions at national level to mitigate the effects of disease in farm animal populations
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr K. S. Howe, Room 302, Laver Building, North Park Road, University of Exeter, Devon, EX4 4QE, UK. (Email: K.S.Howe@exeter.ac.uk)

References

Hide All
1.Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Scottish Executive, Welsh Assembly Government. Animal Health and Welfare Strategy for Great Britain. London: Defra, 2004 pp. 40.
2.Health and Consumer Protection Directorate-General. A new animal health strategy for the European Union (2007–2013) where ‘prevention is better than cure’, Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM 539, 2007 final. Brussels: European Commission, 2007, pp. 28.
3.Heady, EO. Economics of Agricultural Production and Resource Use, Englewood Cliffs, N.J: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1952, pp. 850.
4.Beattie, BR, Taylor, CR, Watts, MJ. The Economics of Production, 2nd edn.Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing Company, 2009, pp. 299.
5.Häsler, BN,Economic assessment of veterinary surveillance programmes that are part of the national control plan of Switzerland (thesis). London, UK: University of London, Royal Veterinary College, 2011, 235 pp.
6.Thrusfield, M. Veterinary Epidemiology, 3rd edn.Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Science, 2005, pp. 137144, 364367.
7.Hicks, JR. The Theory of Wages. London: Macmillan, 1932, pp. 117.
8.Heathfield, DF, Wibe, S. An Introduction to Cost and Production Functions. Basingstoke and London: Macmillan Education Ltd, 1987, pp. 5860.
9.Howe, KS, Christiansen, KH. The state of animal health economics: a review. In: Reid, SWJ, Menzies, FD, Russell, AM, eds. Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine. Martigny: Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, 2004, pp. 157158.
10.Rushton, J, Viscara, R, Otte, J, McCleod, A, Taylor, N. Animal health economics – where have we come from and where do we go next. CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources 2007; 031: 110.
11.Rich, KM, Perry, BD. The economic and poverty impacts of animal diseases in developing countries: new roles, new demands for economics and epidemiology. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 2011; 101: 133147.
12.Rich, K.New methods for integrated models of animal disease control. Paper presented at the American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting, Portland, Oregon, 29 July–1 August 2007 (http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/9701/1/sp07ri03.pdf).
13.Häsler, B, Howe, KS, Di Labio, E, Schwermer, H, Stärk, KDC. Economic evaluation of the surveillance and intervention programme for bluetongue virus serotype 8 in Switzerland. Preventive Veterinary Medicine 2012; 103: 93111.
14.Häsler, B, Howe, KS, Presi, P, Stärk, KDC. An economic model to evaluate the mitigation programme for bovine viral diarrhoea in Switzerland. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. Published online: 06 03 2012. doi:10.1016/j.prevetmed.2011.12.010.
15.Häsler, B, et al. A qualitative approach to measure the effectiveness of active avian influenza virus surveillance with respect to its cost: a case study from Switzerland. Preventive Veterinary Medicine. Published online: 31 01 2012. doi:10.1016/j.prevetmed.2011.12.010
16.Mishan, EJ, Quah, E. Cost-Benefit Analysis, 5th edn.London, New York: Routledge, 2007, pp. 329.
17.Fujiwara, D, Campbell, R.Valuation techniques for social cost-benefit analysis: stated preference, revealed preference and subjective well-being approaches – a discussion of the current issues. London: HM Treasury and Department for Work and Pensions, 2011, pp. 76.
18.Rushton, J. The Economics of Animal Health and Production, Oxford: CABI International, 2009, pp. 124127.
19.McInerney, JP, Howe, KS, Schepers, JA. Cost-benefit analysis of disease control programmes. In: A Framework and Methodology for the Economic Analysis of Disease in Farm Livestock, Report of a Research Project, Ref. CSA 873, funded by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. University of Exeter: Agricultural Economics Unit, 1990, pp. 3944.
20.McInerney, JP. Cost-benefit analysis of livestock disease: a simplified look at its economic foundations. In: Martin, SW, ed. Proceedings of the 6th ISVEE Symposium. Ottawa: International Symposium on Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 1991, pp. 149153.
21.Tisdell, C. Assessing the approach to cost-benefi analysis of controlling livestock diseases of McInerney and Others. Research Papers and Reports in Animal Health Economics, No. 3. Brisbane: Department of Economics, University of Queensland, 1995. pp. 21.
22.Brown, M. The Theory and Empirical Analysis of Production. Studies in Income and Wealth, volume 31. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research, distributed by Columbia University Press, 1967, pp. 515.
23.Heady, EO, Dillon, JL. Agricultural Production Functions. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 1961, pp. 667.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed