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The distinct epidemic characteristics of HCV co-infection among HIV-1-infected population caused by drug injection and sexual transmission in Yunnan, China

  • A-Mei Zhang (a1), Ming Yang (a1), Li Gao (a2), Mi Zhang (a2), Lingshuai Jiao (a1), Yue Feng (a1), Xingqi Dong (a2) and Xueshan Xia (a1)...

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in Yunnan province. We studied the epidemic characteristics of HCV in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Serum from 894 HIV-1 patients was collected, together with basic information and biochemical features. All samples were infected with HIV through injecting drug users (IDUs) and sexual transmission (ST). The NS5B gene was amplified and sequenced to affirm HCV genotype. In total, 202 HIV patients were co-infected with HCV, and most (81.19%) of co-infected patients were IDUs. Genotype 3b was predominant (37.62%) in these samples, and its frequency was similar in patients with IDU and ST. The frequencies of genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 6a, 6n, 2a and 6u were 3.96%, 16.34%, 23.76%, 6.93%, 10.40%, 0.50% and 0.50%, respectively. However, genotype 3a showed significantly different frequency in HCV patients with IDU and ST (P = 0.019). When HCV patients were divided into subgroups, the haemoglobin (HGB) level was significantly higher in patients with genotype 3a than in patients with 3b (P = 0.033), 6a (P = 0.006) and 6n (P = 0.007), respectively. Although no difference existed among HCV subgroups, HIV-viral load was identified to be positively correlated with the HGB level and CD4+ cells when dividing HCV/HIV co-infected persons into male and female groups. In conclusion, genotype 3b was the predominant HCV genotype in Yunnan HIV/HCV co-infected persons. The HGB level was higher in patients with genotype 3a than others. HIV-viral load was positively correlated with the HGB level and CD4+ cells in the male or female HCV-infected group.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Xingqi Dong, E-mail: dongxq8001@126.com and Xueshan Xia, E-mail: oliverxia2000@aliyun.com

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These three authors equally contributed to this study.

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References

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Keywords

The distinct epidemic characteristics of HCV co-infection among HIV-1-infected population caused by drug injection and sexual transmission in Yunnan, China

  • A-Mei Zhang (a1), Ming Yang (a1), Li Gao (a2), Mi Zhang (a2), Lingshuai Jiao (a1), Yue Feng (a1), Xingqi Dong (a2) and Xueshan Xia (a1)...

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