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Differences in the epidemiology between paediatric and adult invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections

  • L. ZACHARIADOU (a1), A. STATHI (a1) (a2), P. T. TASSIOS (a2), A. PANGALIS (a1), N. J. LEGAKIS (a2), the Hellenic Strep-Euro Study Group and J. PAPAPARASKEVAS (a2)...

Summary

In order to investigate for possible differences between paediatric and adult invasive Streptococcus pyogenes (iGAS) infections, a total of 142 cases were identified in 17 Greek hospitals during 2003–2007, of which 96 were children and 46 adults. Bacteraemia, soft tissue infections, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), and necrotizing fasciitis were the main clinical presentations (67·6%, 45·1%, 13·4%, and 12·0% of cases, respectively). Bacteraemia and lymphadenitis were significantly more frequent in children (P = 0·019 and 0·021, respectively), whereas STSS was more frequent in adults (P = 0·017). The main predisposing factors in children were varicella and streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis (25% and 19·8%, respectively), as opposed to malignancy, intravenous drug abuse and diabetes mellitus in adults (19·6%, 15·2% and 10·9%, respectively). Of the two dominant emm-types, 1 and 12 (28·2% and 8·5%, respectively), the proportion of emm-type 12 remained stable during the study period, whereas emm-type 1 rates fluctuated considerably. Strains of emm-type 1 from children were associated with erythromycin susceptibility, STSS and intensive-care-unit admission, whereas emm-type 12 isolates from adults were associated with erythromycin and clindamycin resistance. Finally, specific emm-types were detected exclusively in adults or in children. In conclusion, several clinical and epidemiological differences were detected, that could prove useful in designing age-focused strategies for prevention and treatment of iGAS infections.

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Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr J. Papaparaskevas, Department of Microbiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Mikras Asias 75, 11527, Goudi, Athens, Greece. (Email: ipapapar@med.uoa.gr)

References

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