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The detection of toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans from cats with nasal inflammation in Japan

  • J. SAEKI (a1), C. KATSUKAWA (a2), M. MATSUBAYASHI (a3), H. NAKANISHI (a1), M. FURUYA (a1), H. TANI (a1) and K. SASAI (a1)...

Summary

Corynebacterium ulcerans (toxigenic C. ulcerans) produces the diphtheria toxin, which causes pharyngeal and cutaneous diphtheria-like disease in people, and this bacterium is commonly detected in dogs and cats that are reared at home. It is considered dangerous when a carrier animal becomes the source of infection in people. To investigate the carrier situation of toxigenic C. ulcerans of cats bred in Japan, bacteria were isolated from 37 cats with a primary complaint of rhinitis in 16 veterinary hospitals in Osaka. Toxigenic C. ulcerans was detected in two of the cats. By drug sensitivity testing, the detected bacterium was sensitive to all investigated drugs, except clindamycin. It appears necessary to create awareness regarding toxigenic C. ulcerans infection in pet owners because this bacterium is believed to be the causative organism for rhinitis in cats.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr K. Sasai, Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Division of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka 598-8531, Japan, 72-254-9918. (Email: ksasai@vet.osakafu-u.ac.jp)

References

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Keywords

The detection of toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans from cats with nasal inflammation in Japan

  • J. SAEKI (a1), C. KATSUKAWA (a2), M. MATSUBAYASHI (a3), H. NAKANISHI (a1), M. FURUYA (a1), H. TANI (a1) and K. SASAI (a1)...

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