Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Descriptive epidemiology of enteric disease in Chennai, India

  • R. D. CHOPRA (a1) and M. S. DWORKIN (a1)

Summary

There are very few data on the prevalence of coccidian enteric parasites among low-income adults hospitalized in Chennai, India. Stool samples from 200 patients were screened for selected parasites, enteric bacterial pathogens, and other protozoa over a 3-month period. The study identified 42 (21%) Cryptosporidium, 36 (18%) V. cholerae, 17 (9%) Salmonellla, 12 (6%) Isospora, six (3%) helminths, five (3%) Shigella, one (1%) Cyclospora, one (1%) other protozoan, and 0% V. parahaemolyticus cases. Co-infection was present in 21 patients. Cryptosporidium was detected in 17 (81%) of co-infected patients. Our findings highlighted the relatively high proportion of patients in this population with Cryptosporidium and Isospora and suggest that further study be undertaken to determine the utility of broader use of diagnostic testing for coccidian parasites in India. Detection may be beneficial because isosporiasis is treatable and both Isospora and Cryptosporidium are important pathogens in AIDS patients.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Descriptive epidemiology of enteric disease in Chennai, India
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Descriptive epidemiology of enteric disease in Chennai, India
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Descriptive epidemiology of enteric disease in Chennai, India
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: R. D. Chopra, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois, 1603 W. Taylor St, MC 92, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. (Email: rchopr2@uic.edu)

References

Hide All
1.World Health Organization. Diarrhoea: why children are still dying and what can be done, 2009.
2.Putignani, L, Menichella, D. Global distribution, public health, and clinical impact of the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases 2010, pp. 39.
3.Dwivedi, KK, et al. Enteric opportunistic parasites among HIV infected individuals: associated risk factors and immune status. Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases 2007; 60: 7681.
4.Davis, J. The massive waterborne outbreak of Cryptosporidium infections, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1993. In: Dworkin, MS, ed. Cases in Field Epidemiology: A Global Perspective. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011, pp. 121–44.
5.Yoder, JS, Harral, C, Beach, MJ. Cryptosporidiosis surveillance – United States, 2006–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (Surveillance Summaries) 2010; 59: 114.
6.Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Global report: UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic, 2010.
7.Government of India. Poverty estimates for 2004–2005. Press Information Bureau, New Delhi, 2007.
8.Vignesh, R, et al. High proportion of isosporiasis among HIV-infected patients with diarrhea in southern India. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2007; 77: 823824.
9.Kumar, SS, Ananthan, S, Lakshmi, P. Intestinal parasitic infection in HIV infected patients with diarrhoea in Chennai. Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology 2002; 20: 8891.
10.Anbazhagi, M, et al. Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking water supply of Chennai City, Southern India. CLEAN – Soil, Air, Water 2007; 35: 167171.
11.Casemore, D. Towards a US national estimate of the risk of endemic waterborne disease – seroepidemiologic studies. Journal of Water Health 2006; 4 (Suppl. 2): 121163.
12.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cryptosporidosis – a guide to water filters. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010.

Keywords

Descriptive epidemiology of enteric disease in Chennai, India

  • R. D. CHOPRA (a1) and M. S. DWORKIN (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed