Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Dairy farm investigation on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in Kolkata, India with emphasis on molecular characterization

  • S. C. DAS (a1), A. KHAN (a2), P. PANJA (a1), S. DATTA (a2), A. SIKDAR (a1), S. YAMASAKI (a3), Y. TAKEDA (a4), S. K. BHATTACHARYA (a2), T. RAMAMURTHY (a2) and G. BALAKRISH NAIR (a5)...

Abstract

An investigation was conducted to determine the distribution, virulence gene profile and phenotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains within a dairy farm in Kolkata, India by characterizing the STEC strains isolated from healthy dairy cow and calf stool samples, raw milk and farm floor swabs from July 2001 to March 2002. Primary screening by multiplex-PCR detected stx1 and stx2, the common virulence genes of STEC, in 18·9% of cow faeces, 32·4% of calf stool samples, 21·6% of farm floor swabs and 4·5% of raw milk samples and viable STEC were recovered from 4·5, 9·9, 8·1 and 1·8% of the corresponding PCR-positive samples. Strains harbouring stx1 (63·3%) and hlyA (53·3%) were frequently detected compared to eae (13·3%). Most of the strains harboured similar sets of reported virulence genes common among isolates from diarrhoea patients. Most of the strains also exhibited multidrug resistance, sorbitol fermentation and produced enterohaemolysin. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA–PCR (RAPD–PCR) profile of the STEC strains isolated from the farm milieu revealed diverse banding patterns and clonal analysis demonstrated that the strains from different sources were not identical but showed some genetic relatedness. The study demonstrates the potential of dairy farm for housing virulent STEC.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Dairy farm investigation on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in Kolkata, India with emphasis on molecular characterization
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Dairy farm investigation on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in Kolkata, India with emphasis on molecular characterization
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Dairy farm investigation on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in Kolkata, India with emphasis on molecular characterization
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Laboratory Sciences Division, International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR, B), Mohakhali, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh. (Email: gbnair@icddrb.org)

Dairy farm investigation on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in Kolkata, India with emphasis on molecular characterization

  • S. C. DAS (a1), A. KHAN (a2), P. PANJA (a1), S. DATTA (a2), A. SIKDAR (a1), S. YAMASAKI (a3), Y. TAKEDA (a4), S. K. BHATTACHARYA (a2), T. RAMAMURTHY (a2) and G. BALAKRISH NAIR (a5)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed