Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds

  • W. ZHANG (a1), Q. SHEN (a1), J. MOU (a1), Z. B. YANG (a1), C. L. YUAN (a1), L. CUI (a1), J. G. ZHU (a1), X. G. HUA (a1), C. M. XU (a2) and J. HU (a2)...

Summary

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic pathogen of which several species of animals are considered to be reservoirs. Thirty-eight faecal samples, obtained from 22 species of animals including birds in a wildlife first-aid centre in Eastern China, were tested for HEV RNA. Our survey revealed that in total 28·9% (95% confidence interval 14·5–43·4) of the faecal samples from various mammals and birds were HEV RNA positive. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the 11 isolates demonstrated that all sequences clustered in genotype 4 with 96–100% identity to each other. In addition, serum samples from seven animal handlers have shown that five (71·4%) were seropositive. The findings imply that cross-species infection of HEV had probably occurred in this zoo-like location, and moreover, birds can be infected naturally with mammalian HEV.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Cross-species infection of hepatitis E virus in a zoo-like location, including birds
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Professor X. G. Hua, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, PRChina. (Email: hxg@sjtu.edu.cn)

References

Hide All
1. Reyes, GR, et al. Isolation of a cDNA from the virus responsible for enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis. Science 1990; 247: 13351339.
2. Li, TC, et al. Hepatitis E virus transmission from wild boar meat. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2005; 11: 19581960.
3. Tei, S, et al. Zoonotic transmission of hepatitis E virus from deer to human beings. Lancet 2003; 362: 371373.
4. Meng, XJ, et al. Prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis E virus in veterinarians working with swine and in normal blood donors in the United States and other countries. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2002; 40: 117122.
5. Drobeniuc, J, et al. Hepatitis E virus antibody prevalence among persons who work with swine. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2001; 184: 15941597.
6. Zheng, Y, et al. Swine as a principal reservoir of hepatitis E virus that infects humans in eastern China. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2006; 193: 16431649.
7. Meng, XJ, et al. Prevalence of antibodies to the hepatitis E virus in pigs from countries where hepatitis E is common or is rare in the human population. Journal of Medical Virology 1999; 59: 297302.
8. Withers, MR, et al. Antibody levels to hepatitis E virus in North Carolina swine workers, non-swine workers, swine, and murids. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2002; 66: 384388.
9. Caron, M, et al. Identification of genotype 1 hepatitis E virus in samples from swine in Cambodia. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2006; 44: 34403442.
10. Huang, R, et al. Existing variations on the gene structure of hepatitis E virus strains from some regions of China. Journal of Medical Virology 1995; 47: 303308.
11. Huang, FF, et al. Heterogeneity and seroprevalence of a newly identified avian hepatitis E virus from chickens in the United States. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2002; 40: 41974202.
12. Cooper, K, et al. Identification of genotype 3 hepatitis E virus (HEV) in serum and faecal samples from pigs in Thailand and Mexico, where genotype 1 and 2 HEV strains are prevalent in the respective human populations. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2005; 43: 16841688.
13. Sun, ZF, et al. Genetic identification of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) from healthy chicken flocks and characterization of the capsid gene of 14 avian HEV isolates from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in different geographical regions of the United States. Journal of General Virology 2004; 85: 693700.
14. Wang, Y. Epidemiology, molecular biology and zoonosis of genotype IV hepatitis E in China [in Chinese]. Chinese Journal of Epidemiology 2003; 24: 618622.
15. Lu, L, Li, C, Hagedorn, CH. Phylogenetic analysis of global hepatitis E virus sequences: genetic diversity, subtypes and zoonosis. Reviews in Medical Virology 2006; 16: 536.
16. Satou, K, Nishiura, H. Transmission dynamics of hepatitis E among swine: potential impact upon human infection. BMC Veterinary Research 2007; 3: 9.
17. Yu, C, et al. Using improved technology for filter paper-based blood collection to survey wild Sika deer for antibodies to hepatitis E virus. Journal of Virological Methods 2007; 142: 143150.
18. Matsuura, Y, et al. Prevalence of antibody to hepatitis E virus among wild sika deer, Cervus nippon, in Japan. Archives of Virology 2007; 152: 13751381.
19. Billam, P, et al. Systematic pathogenesis and replication of avian hepatitis E virus in specific-pathogen-free adult chickens. Journal of Virology 2005; 79: 34293437.
20. Haqshenas, G, et al. The putative capsid protein of the newly identified avian hepatitis E virus shares antigenic epitopes with that of swine and human hepatitis E viruses and chicken big liver and spleen disease virus. Journal of General Virology 2002; 83: 22012209.
21. Huang, FF, et al. Determination and analysis of the complete genomic sequence of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) and attempts to infect rhesus monkeys with avian HEV. Journal of General Virology 2004; 85: 16091618.
22. Sun, ZF, et al. Generation and infectivity titration of an infectious stock of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) in chickens and cross-species infection of turkeys with avian HEV. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2004; 42: 26582662.
23. Tanaka, H, et al. Molecular investigation of hepatitis E virus infection in domestic and miniature pigs used for medical experiments. Xenotransplantation 2004; 11: 503510.
24. Cooper, K, et al. Identification of genotype 3 hepatitis E virus (HEV) in serum and fecal samples from pigs in Thailand and Mexico, where genotype 1 and 2 HEV strains are prevalent in the respective human populations. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2005; 43: 16841688.
25. Halbur, PG, et al. Comparative pathogenesis of infection of pigs with hepatitis E viruses recovered from a pig and a human. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2001; 39: 918923.
26. Dong, C, et al. Identification of genetic diversity of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and determination of the seroprevalence of HEV in eastern China. Archives of Virology 2007; 152: 39746.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed