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The complications of intravenous cannulae incorporating a valved injection side port

  • J. S. Cheesbrough (a1), R. G. Finch (a1) and J. T. Macfarlane (a2)

Summary

In a series of 519 intravenous cannulae with valved injection side-ports the incidence of cannula-related local inflammation was 25·2% and bacteraemia 0·2%. Severe local inflammation was associated with a longer mean duration of cannulation, 59·4 v. 81·4 h (P = <0·05). There was no significant association between the presence of local inflammation and microbial colonization of either the intravascular segment of the cannula, the adjacent skin, or the side-port. The data suggest that colonization of the cannulae was usually secondary to prior skin colonization. Side-port colonization did not, predispose to cannula colonization. Organisms colonizing the side-port were biologically different and were possibly derived from the skin of medical attendants. In the final 157 patients, randomized to receive either isopropyl alcohol or 0·5% chlorhexidine in 70% spirit skin preparation, there was no difference in the incidence of either local inflammation or microbial colonization.

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References

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The complications of intravenous cannulae incorporating a valved injection side port

  • J. S. Cheesbrough (a1), R. G. Finch (a1) and J. T. Macfarlane (a2)

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