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A clinical prediction rule for urinary tract infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care

  • L. M. A. J. VENMANS (a1), K. J. GORTER (a1), G. E. H. M. RUTTEN (a1), F. G. SCHELLEVIS (a2), A. I. M. HOEPELMAN (a3) and E. HAK (a1)...

Summary

We aimed to develop a prediction rule for urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A 12-month prospective cohort study was conducted in patients with DM2 aged ⩾45 years to predict the occurrence of recurrent UTIs in women and lower UTIs in men. Predictors for recurrent UTI in women (n=81, 2%) and lower UTIs in men (n=93, 3%) were age, number of general practitioner (GP) visits, urinary incontinence, cerebrovascular disease or dementia. In women, renal disease was an additional predictor. The optimum corrected area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) was 0·79 (95% CI 0·74–0·83) for women and 0·75 (95% CI 0·70–0·80) for men. Using a cut-off score of 4, women with a lower risk assignment had a probability of 0·3% for the outcome. For a cut-off score of 6, women with a higher risk assignment had a probability of 5·8%. For men these figures were 0·8 and 7·1 for a cut-off score of 2 and 4, respectively. Simple variables can be used for the risk stratification of patients.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr K. J. Gorter, University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, HPNr. 6.131, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands. (Email: k.j.gorter@umcutrecht.nl)

References

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Keywords

A clinical prediction rule for urinary tract infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care

  • L. M. A. J. VENMANS (a1), K. J. GORTER (a1), G. E. H. M. RUTTEN (a1), F. G. SCHELLEVIS (a2), A. I. M. HOEPELMAN (a3) and E. HAK (a1)...

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