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Chronic Strongyloides stercoralis infection in Laotian immigrants and refugees 7–20 years after resettlement in Australia

  • S. DE SILVA (a1), P. SAYKAO (a2), H. KELLY (a3), C. R. MACINTYRE (a4), N. RYAN (a3), J. LEYDON (a3) and B-A. BIGGS (a1) (a3)...

Abstract

During the period 1974–91 large numbers of Southeast Asian immigrants and refugees were resettled in Western countries, including Australia. Health screening during this period demonstrated that intestinal parasite infections were common. A cross-sectional survey of 95 Laotian settlers who arrived in Australia on average 12 years prior to the study was conducted to determine if chronic intestinal parasite infections were prevalent in this group. Twenty-three participants had positive Strongyloides stercoralis test results (22 with positive serology, including 1 with S. stercoralis larvae detected in faeces and another with larvae and equivocal serology). Of these 23 participants, 18 (78%) had an elevated eosinophil count. Two patients had eggs of Opisthorchis spp. identified by faecal microscopy. The detection of chronic strongyloidiasis in Laotian settlers is a concern because of the potential serious morbidity associated with this pathogen.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence. The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, 3050 Victoria, Australia.

Chronic Strongyloides stercoralis infection in Laotian immigrants and refugees 7–20 years after resettlement in Australia

  • S. DE SILVA (a1), P. SAYKAO (a2), H. KELLY (a3), C. R. MACINTYRE (a4), N. RYAN (a3), J. LEYDON (a3) and B-A. BIGGS (a1) (a3)...

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