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Characteristics of patients with Clostridium difficile infection in Taiwan

  • Y.-C. LIN (a1) (a2), Y.-T. HUANG (a3), T.-F. LEE (a4), N.-Y. LEE (a5), C.-H. LIAO (a6), S.-Y. LIN (a1) (a2), W.-C. KO (a5) and P.-R. HSUEH (a3) (a4)...

Summary

The medical records of 84 patients with stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile during the period August 2007 to June 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. A case of confirmed (toxigenic) C. difficile infection (CDI) was defined by the presence of symptoms (fever, diarrhoea, abdominal discomfort or distension, ileus) and the presence of toxigenic C. difficile. Patients with compatible clinical symptoms and stool cultures positive for non-toxigenic C. difficile isolates were defined as probable (non-toxigenic) CDI cases. Of these 84 patients, 50 (59·5%) were diagnosed as confirmed CDI and 34 (40·5%) as probable CDI. Thirteen (15·5%) of the 84 patients died during their hospital stay. Usage of proton pump inhibitors was a significant independent risk factor for CDI (OR 3·21, P = 0·014). Of the 50 isolates associated with confirmed CDI, seven (8·3%) carried binary toxin genes (cdtAB), and six (7·1%) had a deletion in the tcdC gene. The mortality rate in confirmed CDI patients with isolates exhibiting deletion in the tcdC gene (2/6, 33·3%), those with isolates harbouring binary toxin genes (2/7, 28·6%), and those with isolates containing mutations in gyrA (2/7, 28·6%) and gyrB (1/2, 50%) was higher than the overall mortality rate (10/50, 20%) in patients with confirmed CDI.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr P. R. Hsueh, Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, No. 7, Chung-Shan South Road, Taipei, Taiwan. (Email: hsporen@ntu.edu.tw)

References

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Keywords

Characteristics of patients with Clostridium difficile infection in Taiwan

  • Y.-C. LIN (a1) (a2), Y.-T. HUANG (a3), T.-F. LEE (a4), N.-Y. LEE (a5), C.-H. LIAO (a6), S.-Y. LIN (a1) (a2), W.-C. KO (a5) and P.-R. HSUEH (a3) (a4)...

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