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A case-control study of risk factors for rotavirus infections in adults, Denmark, 2005–2009

  • F. DORLEANS (a1) (a2), G. FALKENHORST (a1) (a2), B. BÖTTIGER (a3) (a4), M. HOWITZ (a1), S. MIDGLEY (a3), J. NIELSEN (a1), K. MØLBAK (a1) and S. ETHELBERG (a1)...

Summary

Rotavirus (RV) infections affect young children, but can also occur in adults. We sought to identify risk factors for RV infections in adults aged ⩾18 years in Denmark, and to describe illness and genotyping characteristics. From March 2005 to February 2009, we recruited consecutive cases of laboratory-confirmed RV infection and compared them with healthy controls matched by age, gender and municipality of residence. We collected information on illness characteristics and exposures using postal questionnaires. We calculated univariable and multivariable matched odds ratios (mOR) with conditional logistic regression. The study comprised 65 cases and 246 controls. Illness exceeded 10 days in 31% of cases; 22% were hospitalized. Cases were more likely than controls to suffer serious underlying health conditions [mOR 5·6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·7–18], and to report having had close contact with persons with gastrointestinal symptoms (mOR 9·4, 95% CI 3·6–24), in particular young children aged <3 years and adults aged >18 years. Close contact with young children or adults with gastrointestinal symptoms is the main risk factor for RV infection in adults in Denmark. RV vaccination assessments should consider that RV vaccination in children may indirectly reduce the burden of disease in adults.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Ms. F. Dorléans, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. (Email: frederique.dorleans@hotmail.fr) [F.D.] (Email: SET@ssi.dk) [S.E.]

References

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Keywords

A case-control study of risk factors for rotavirus infections in adults, Denmark, 2005–2009

  • F. DORLEANS (a1) (a2), G. FALKENHORST (a1) (a2), B. BÖTTIGER (a3) (a4), M. HOWITZ (a1), S. MIDGLEY (a3), J. NIELSEN (a1), K. MØLBAK (a1) and S. ETHELBERG (a1)...

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