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Calling all Campy – how routine investigation and molecular characterization impacts the understanding of campylobacteriosis epidemiology – Alaska, United States, 2004–2013

  • L. J. CASTRODALE (a1), G. M. PROVO (a1), C. M. XAVIER (a2) and J. B. McLAUGHLIN (a1)

Summary

Unlike most jurisdictions in the United States, Alaska performs pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) characterization of all Campylobacter sp. isolates at the state public health laboratory – a practice that started in 2002. Moreover, in order to ensure early detection and response to campylobacteriosis outbreaks, the Alaska Section of Epidemiology has investigated all incident Campylobacter sp. case reports since 2004. This report summarizes the public health impact of routine incident case investigations and molecular characterization of all Campylobacter sp. isolates. In sum, we found that these efforts have contributed to better characterization of the epidemiology of campylobacteriosis in Alaska, and facilitated more rapid outbreak detection, more public health investigations, and earlier public health interventions.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr L. J. Castrodale, AK DHSS/DPH/SOE, 3601 C St, Suite 540, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. (Email louisa.castrodale@alaska.gov)

References

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1. Taylor, EV, et al. Common source outbreaks of Campylobacter infection in the USA, 1997–2008. Epidemiology and Infection 2013; 141: 987996.
2. Ribot, EM, et al. Rapid pulse-field gel electrophoresis protocol for subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni . Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2001; 39: 18891894.
3. Gardner, TJ, et al. Outbreak of campylobacteriosis associated with consumption of raw peas. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2011; 53: 2632.
4. Castrodale, LJ, et al. Sharing milk but not messages: campylobacteriosis associated with consumption of raw milk from a cow-share program – Alaska, 2011. Journal of Food Protection 2013; 5: 744747.
5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet): FoodNet Surveillance Report for 2011 (Final Report). Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, 2012 (Table 18).
6. Campylobacter Sentinel Surveillance Scheme Collaborators. Point source outbreaks of Campylobacter jejuni infection – are they more common than we think and what might cause them? Epidemiology and Infection 2013; 130: 367375.
7. Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Position Statement 14-ID-09. Standardized surveillance for campylobacteriosis and addition to the nationally notifiable condition list (http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.cste.org/resource/resmgr/2014PS/14_ID_09upd.pdf). Accessed 6 January 2015.

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